Selecting all columns of a database table with an SQL GROUP BY expression

Suppose we have an SQL database table named “temperatures” with the following contents:

LOCATION  TIME        CELSIUS
inside    2018-08-01  24
inside    2018-08-02  28
inside    2018-08-03  21
inside    2018-08-04  28
outside   2018-08-01  29
outside   2018-08-02  31
outside   2018-08-03  25
outside   2018-08-04  30

We want to find the highest temperature for each location. We use the MAX aggregate function and a GROUP BY expression:

SELECT location, MAX(celsius) celsius
FROM temperatures
GROUP BY location;

As expected, the result is:

LOCATION  CELSIUS
outside   31
inside    28

Now suppose we also want to know when each of these extreme temperatures occured. Naively, we try the following query:

SELECT location, time, MAX(celsius) celsius
FROM temperatures
GROUP BY location;

The response is an error: “not a GROUP BY expression”. In a GROUP BY expression all selected columns must be either part of the GROUP BY clause or an aggregate.

To achieve what we want we can use a JOIN:

SELECT
  t.location, t.time, t.celsius
FROM
  temperatures t
JOIN (SELECT location, MAX(celsius) celsius
      FROM temperatures
      GROUP BY location) tmax
ON
  t.location=tmax.location AND t.celsius=tmax.celsius;

This query results in multiple rows per location if the maximum temperature was recorded at different times:

LOCATION  TIME        CELSIUS
outside   2018-08-02  31
inside    2018-08-04  28
inside    2018-08-02  28

If we are only interested in the first occurrence of the maximum temperature per location, we can use the following query:

SELECT
  location,
  MIN(time) KEEP (DENSE_RANK LAST ORDER BY celsius) time,
  MAX(celsius) celsius
FROM
  temperatures
GROUP BY
  location;
LOCATION  TIME        CELSIUS
inside    2018-08-02  28
outside   2018-08-02  31

Here we don’t need a JOIN anymore, because select clause for the time column is an aggregate as well.