How I start a project – the next steps

After the initial meetings with the project stakeholders my next step is to get a big picture of the processes the project tries to improve. Every (enterprise) software implements processes or workflows stemming from the business side. Since I want to improve the work for the people using the software I take the user’s perspective and try to understand it and describe it from their perspective.
For this task my go-to-tool is the user journey map. My first draft starts with a handful of steps outlining the main functions performed by the major actors. These are normally just 5 – 7 steps and serve as an overview and communication starter:

Often some users or other systems interact inside one process. Important is to concentrate on the big picture, the big steps of the process. These are the ones you need to get right, details and deviations from the process come after that. The point of all the drawings and documents I use is to foster a shared understanding between the stakeholders (including the users) and the team. We as a whole need to talk about the same things with the same language. If one step has different name we have to rename it to match the name used by the stakeholders. This is crucial. The same applies to the names used in the user interface. These must be the ones used by the users, not some internal words, not even synonyms.
From the big picture I iterate through the assumptions and getting more detailed on the way. Assumptions can make or break a project. Even if I am pretty sure I need to verify which means often ask or observe the user. The method for getting a good answer depends on the kind of assumption. But I need to verify. I usually use a wiki to record assumptions in the form of open questions like

  • which device will be used for this process?
  • will step 3 always be the next step?
  • how does the user hold the device?

These question get more detailed in the course of the project. Even when implementing the solution in code questions will arise. These need to be verified. Sometimes the question can be answered by the defined goals: which solution helps the user reaching his goals. If I cannot answer the question from the collected information, I need to ask questions, test it with prototypes, observe the user or do some research.
Usually along the way I use a prototype, mockup or demo to show how I understand the problem of the users. Again this is a great point for build a shared understanding. Sometimes I need a picture and often a simulation of the steps and actions involved. These interactive prototypes help to spark discussions about details I didn’t think of in the first place. Details that matter. Details that when overseen or seen too late can defer or break the project. When there are still in demo form or in a prototype the stakeholders find it easier to discuss things and the amount of work done is minimal. These demos evolve over time and are the basis for the solution later on. This does not mean that I reuse the code, but I reuse the insights gained from them.
Also prototypes are great for spikes evaluating a solution, the feasibility of a technology or testing assumptions. Prototypes are not only for the start of the project but can be used throughout. Sometimes something quick has to be tested without compromising the application as a whole. Here small and separate prototypes can be used.

One thought on “How I start a project – the next steps

  1. Pingback: UX is a mindset, not an engineering task | Schneide Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.