Using OpenVPN in an automated deployment

In my previous post I showed how to use Ansible in a Docker container to deploy a software release to some remote server and how to trigger the deployment using a Jenkins job.

But what can we do if the target server is not directly reachable over SSH?

Many organizations use a virtual private network (VPN) infrastructure to provide external parties access to their internal services. If there is such an infrastructure in place we can extend our deployment process to use OpenVPN and still work in an unattended fashion like before.

Adding OpenVPN to our container

To be able to use OpenVPN non-interactively in our container we need to add several elements:

  1. Install OpenVPN:
    RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update && apt-get -y install openvpn
  2. Create a file with the credentials using environment variables:
    CMD echo -e "${VPN_USER}\n${VPN_PASSWORD}" > /tmp/openvpn.access
  3. Connect with OpenVPN using an appropriate VPN configuration and wait for OpenVPN to establish the connection:
    openvpn --config /deployment/our-client-config.ovpn --auth-user-pass /tmp/openvpn.access --daemon && sleep 10

Putting it together our extended Dockerfile may look like this:

FROM ubuntu:18.04
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get -y dist-upgrade
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get -y install software-properties-common
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update && apt-get -y install ansible ssh
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update && apt-get -y install openvpn

SHELL ["/bin/bash", "-c"]
# A place for our vault password file
RUN mkdir /ansible/

# Setup work dir
WORKDIR /deployment

COPY deployment/${TARGET_HOST} .

# Deploy the proposal submission system using openvpn and ansible
CMD echo -e "${VAULT_PASSWORD}" > /ansible/vault.access && \
echo -e "${VPN_USER}\n${VPN_PASSWORD}" > /tmp/openvpn.access && \
ansible-vault decrypt --vault-password-file=/ansible/vault.access ${TARGET_HOST}/credentials/deployer && \
openvpn --config /deployment/our-client-config.ovpn --auth-user-pass /tmp/openvpn.access --daemon && \
sleep 10 && \
ansible-playbook -i ${TARGET_HOST}, -u root --key-file ${TARGET_HOST}/credentials/deployer ansible/deploy.yml && \
ansible-vault encrypt --vault-password-file=/ansible/vault.access ${TARGET_HOST}/credentials/deployer && \
rm -rf /ansible && \
rm /tmp/openvpn.access

As you can see the CMD got quite long and messy by now. In production we put the whole process of executing the Ansible and OpenVPN commands into a shell script as part of our deployment infrastructure. That way we separate the preparations of the environment from the deployment steps themselves. The CMD looks a bit more friendly then:

CMD echo -e "${VPN_USER}\n${VPN_PASSWORD}" > /vpn/openvpn.access && \
echo -e "${VAULT_PASSWORD}" > /ansible/vault.access && \
chmod +x deploy.sh && \
./deploy.sh

As another aside you may have to mess around with nameserver configuration depending on the OpenVPN configuration and other infrastructure details. I left that out because it seems specific to the setup with our customer.

Fortunately, there is nothing to do on the ansible side as the whole VPN stuff should be completely transparent for the tools using the network connection to do their job. However we need some additional settings in our Jenkins job.

Adjusting the Jenkins Job

The Jenkins job needs the VPN credentials added and some additional parameters to docker run for the network tunneling to work in the container. The credentials are simply another injected password we may call JOB_VPN_PASSWORD and the full script may now look like follows:

docker build -t app-deploy -f deployment/docker/Dockerfile .
docker run --rm \
--cap-add=NET_ADMIN \
--device=/dev/net/tun \
-e VPN_USER=our-client-vpn-user \
-e VPN_PASSWORD=${JOB_VPN_PASSWORD} \-e VAULT_PASSWORD=${JOB_VAULT_PASSWORD} \
-e TARGET_HOST=${JOB_TARGET_HOST} \
-e ANSIBLE_HOST_KEY_CHECKING=False \
-v `pwd`/artifact:/artifact \
app-deploy

DOCKER_RUN_RESULT=`echo $?`
exit $DOCKER_RUN_RESULT

Conclusion

Adding VPN-support to your automated deployment is not that hard but there are some details to be aware of:

  • OpenVPN needs the credentials in a file – similar to Ansible – to be able to run non-interactively
  • OpenVPN either stays in the foreground or daemonizes right away if you tell it to, not only after the connection was successful. So you have to wait a sufficiently long time before proceeding with your deployment process
  • For OpenVPN to work inside a container docker needs some additional flags to allow proper tunneling of network connections
  • DNS-resolution can be tricky depending on the actual infrastructure. If you experience problems either tune your setup by adjusting name resolution in the container or access the target machines using IPs…

After ironing out the gory details depicted above we have a secure and convenient deployment process that saves a lot of time and nerves in the long run because you can update the deployment at the press of a button.

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