Inductive types on the rise

One thing I really got used to when using Agda for academic projects are inductive types. And inductive types are probably what I currently miss most when using mainstream languages to solve practical problems.

This Post is aimed at software developers that do not know inductive types (Agda, Coq, Idris), variants (OCaml, F#) or GADTs (Haskell). Other software developers might still be interested in the last section about higher inductive types.

What are inductive types?

I will use Agda’s syntax for the most part. Here is a simple example of an inductive type named ‘Bool’:

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The colons are to be read as ‘is of type’ and ‘Set’ is the type of types.  The code defines an inductive type named ‘Bool’ with the constructors ‘True’ and ‘False’. I use ‘constructor’ with a broader meaning than it has in object oriented programming.

The type ‘Bool’ will behave somewhat like the following enum in Java:

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The analogy with ‘enum’ works as long as the constructors have zero arguments. Here is an inductive type where one constructor has one argument:

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For any type ‘A’, ‘Optional A’ will be a type that behaves like an immutable version of ‘Optional<A>’ in Java. So for example, ‘Some True’ would be a value of type ‘Optional Bool’ (Note that function application is written without parenthesis). It is also possible, to have constructors with arguments of the type to be defined:

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The natural numbers defined in this way will be great for verification and very bad for actual calculations since this representation is unary. For example, the number three can be defined with three constructor calls:

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The really interesting thing to note is, that this quite short inductive definition of the natural numbers actually behaves like the natural numbers from mathematics. And you can prove things about those naturals using the same induction based proofs you learn mathematics courses. In Agda, those proofs can be done using pattern matching, the topic of the next section.

In Agda, inductive definitions are also supported for dependent types. There are lots of interesting things that can be done using this combination of concepts. One is an inductive definition of equality for all types. This won’t give you a reasonable ‘Equals’-method for all your types, but it provides you with a consistent notion what such a method should return.

Patterns

The great thing about inductive types is, that functions may be defined by pattern matching. A simple case is the negation function on the type ‘Bool’ defined above:

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The first line declares the type of the new function ‘negation’ to be ‘Bool -> Bool’ and the lines below are a definition by pattern matching. Agda checks if the pattern covers all cases. If you want the same compile time check in Java (prior to version 12) you would have to use a trick.

Here is an example using the types defined above, with a more complicated pattern:

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Note that ‘IsEven’ is recursively used in the last line. The termination checker of Agda makes sure that the recursion doesn’t loop forever and this definition passes this check, since ‘n’ is of a lower ‘height’ than the argument ‘Successor (Successor n)’. So progress will be made on each recursion and the computation will stop eventually.

Those checks are important when pattern matching is used to prove things, which can be done for example in the style of the following pseudo code:

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Higher inductive types

In mathematics new sets are often created by identifying elements of some easy to understand set. For example, the rational numbers can be constructed as pairs of integers ‘(a,b)’, where b is not zero, by identification of pairs ‘(a,b)’ and ‘(c,d)’ if ‘c*b = a*d’.

It is now possible in some systems to construct such quotients as inductive types. Agda has a special mode called ‘cubical’ which allows inductive types to have constructors that ‘produce’ equalities in the inductive type. Here is an excerpt from the standard library for Agda’s cubical mode, that defines the rational numbers inductively:

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The first constructor ‘con’ tells us, that we can produce a rational number from a pair of integers ‘u’ and ‘a’ provided ‘a’ is not zero. The constructor ‘path’ makes the identification explained above. The third constructor ‘trunc’ has to do with some curious weirdness that comes with having ‘inductive equalities’ – some elements of a type might be equal in different ways. ‘trunc’ uses inductive equalities again, to ‘truncate’ the possibilites how rational numbers can be equal back to the expected ‘yes’ and ‘no’.

This appearance of extra equalities between things is by no means a pathology, but a connection to a topic in pure mathematics called homotopy theory. But so far there are not much suggestions how the homotopy theory we have at our fingertips in Agda can help us with pratical programming. If we ‘trunc’ our quotient however, we have a pretty usable way of mimicking the mathematical style described above when defining data types.

As more and more concepts from academic languages pour into the mainstream, I have hopes that I can use at least some inductive techniques some day, saving me from some annoying bugs and hard to read constructions.

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