The World of SQL Dialects

For software projects I work with various relational database management systems (RDBMs), mainly PostgreSQL, MySQL/MariaDB, Oracle Database and Microsoft SQL Server. All of these use SQL as a query language, but the dialects of this language vary wildly, especially when it comes to non-standardized features. One such feature I often use is the aggregation of a list to a string. It does the following.

LEGS    ANIMAL
-----------------
2       Ostrich
2       Human
4       Cat
4       Dog
4       Capybara
6       Ant
8       Spider

Given a table like the one above it groups the elements of a column that have the same value in another column together in a string, concatenated by a separator like a comma:

LEGS    ANIMALS
----------------------------
2       Human, Ostrich
4       Capybara, Cat, Dog
6       Ant
8       Spider

This simple operation has four different syntaxes in the four mentioned database systems, which I want to demonstrate.

PostgreSQL

In PostgreSQL the function is called STRING_AGG:

SELECT legs,
  STRING_AGG(animal, ', ' ORDER BY animal) AS animals
FROM fauna
GROUP BY legs
ORDER BY legs;
MySQL / MariaDB

In MySQL and its fork MariaDB the function is called GROUP_CONCAT, and it has a special syntax to specify the separator:

SELECT legs,
  GROUP_CONCAT(animal ORDER BY animal SEPARATOR ', ') AS animals
FROM fauna
GROUP BY legs
ORDER BY legs;
Oracle

Oracle calls it LISTAGG and specifies the grouping via WITHIN GROUP.

SELECT legs,
  LISTAGG(animal, ', ') WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY animal) AS animals
FROM fauna
GROUP BY legs
ORDER BY legs;
Microsoft SQL Server

SQL Server calls it STRING_AGG like PostgreSQL, but specifies the grouping via WITHIN GROUP like Oracle:

SELECT legs,
  STRING_AGG(animal, ', ') WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY animal) AS animals
FROM fauna
GROUP BY legs
ORDER BY legs;

Unfortunately, as developers we have to live with all these dialects of SQL. Even though there is an ISO standards committee for SQL, database creators love to build non-standard extensions into their products. The situation is worse than the browser-specific extensions and differences of JavaScript, HTML and CSS in modern web browsers. One thing that can paper over these differences are OR-Mappers like Hibernate or query languages like Hibernate’s HQL that abstract over SQL, but they come with their own set of problems.

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