3 rules for projects under version control

Checking out a project under version control should be easy and repeatable. Here are a few tips on how to achieve that:

1. Self-containment

You should not need a specifically configured machine to start working on a project. Ideally, you clone the project and get started. Many things can be a problem to achieve that.
Maybe your project is needs a specific operating system, dependency installed, hardware or database setup to run. I personally draw that line at this:
You get a manual with the code that helps you to set up your development environment once and this should be as automated & easy as possible. You should always be able to run your projects without periphery, i.e. specific hardware that can be plugged in or databases that need to be installed.
To achieve this for hardware, you can often fake it via polymorphic interfaces and dependency injection, much like mocking it for testing. The same can be done with databases – or you can use in-memory databases as a fallback.

2. Separate build-artifacts

Building the project into an executable form should be clearly separated from the source-controlled files. For example, the build should never ever modify a file that is under version control. Ideally, the “build” directory is completely independent from the source – enabling a true out-of-source build. However, it is often a good middle ground to allow building in a few dedicated directories in your source repository – but these need to be in .gitignore.

3. Separate runtime data

In the same way, running your project should not touch any source controlled files. Ideally, the project can be run out-of-source. This is trivial for small programs that do not have data, but once some data needs to be managed by the source control system, it gets a little more tricky for the executables to find the data. For data that needs to be changed by the program (we call these “stores”), it is advisable to maintain templates in the VCS or in codes, and copy them to the runtime directory during the build process. For data that is not changed by running the program, such as images, videos, translation-tables etc., you can copy them as well, or make sure the program finds them in the source repository.

Following these guidelines will make it easier to work with version control, especially when multiple people are involved.

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