Contiguous date ranges in Oracle SQL

In one of my last posts from a couple of weeks ago I wrote about querying gaps between non-contiguous date ranges in Oracle SQL. This week’s post is about contiguous date ranges.

While non-contiguous date ranges are best represented in a database table with a start_date and an end_date column, it is better to represent contiguous date ranges only by one date column, so that we avoid redundancy and do not have to keep the start date of a date range in sync with the end date of the previous date range. In this post I will use the start date:

CREATE TABLE date_ranges (
name VARCHAR2(100),
start_date DATE
);

The example content of the table is:

NAME	START_DATE
----	----------
A	05/02/2020
B	02/04/2020
C	16/04/2020
D	01/06/2020
E	21/06/2020
F	02/07/2020
G	05/08/2020

This representation means that the date range with the most recent start date does not have an end. The application using this data model can choose whether to interpret this as a date range with an open end or just as the end point for the previous range and not as a date range by itself.

While this is a nice non-redundant representation, it is less convenient for queries where we want to have both a start and an end date per row, for example in order to check wether a given date lies within a date range or not. Luckily, we can transform the ranges with a query:

SELECT
date_ranges.*,
LEAD(date_ranges.start_date)
OVER (ORDER BY start_date)
AS end_date
FROM date_ranges;

As in the previous post on non-contiguous date ranges the LEAD analytic function allows you to access the following row from the current row without using a self-join. Here’s the result:

NAME	START_DATE	END_DATE
----	----------	--------
A	05/02/2020	02/04/2020
B	02/04/2020	16/04/2020
C	16/04/2020	01/06/2020
D	01/06/2020	21/06/2020
E	21/06/2020	02/07/2020
F	02/07/2020	05/08/2020
G	05/08/2020	(null)

By using a WITH clause you can use this query like a view and join it with the another table, for example with the join condition that a date lies within a date range:

WITH ranges AS
(SELECT date_ranges.*, LEAD(date_ranges.start_date) OVER (ORDER BY start_date) AS end_date FROM date_ranges)
SELECT timeseries.*, ranges.name
FROM timeseries LEFT OUTER JOIN ranges ON
timeseries.measurement_date
BETWEEN ranges.start_date AND ranges.end_date;

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.