Clang, The Friendly Compiler

A while back I suggested to make friends with your compiler as a basis for developing high quality code. My focus then was GCC since it was and still is the compiler I use most of the time. Well, turns out that although GCC may be a reasonably good companion on the C/C++ development road, there are better alternatives.

Enter Clang: I had heard about Clang a few times in the past but never gave it a real shot. That changed after I watched Chandler Carruth’s talk at GoingNative 2012.

First of all I was stunned by the quote from Richard Stallman about GCC being deliberatly designed to make it hard to use it in non-free software. I always wondered why IDEs like KDevelop keep reinventing the wheel all the time by implementing their own C/C++ parsers instead of using already existing and free GCC code. This was the answer: THEY SIMPLY COULDN’T!!

One main point of Chandler’s talk was the quality of diagnostic messages of Clang. GCC is a friend that although telling you exactly what’s wrong with your code, it often does it with complicated sentences hidden in walls of text.

Clang on the other hand, tries very hard to comprehend what you really wanted to write, it speaks in much more understandable words and shows you the offending code locations with nice graphics.

You could say that compared to Clang, which is empathic, understanding, pragmatic and always tries to be on the same page with you, GCC comes across more like an arrogant, self-pleasing and I’m-more-intelligent-than-you kinda guy.

Where GCC says: “What? That should be a template instantiation? Guess what, you’re doing WRONG!! “, Clang is more like: “Ok my friend, now let’s sit down together and analyse step-by-step what’s the problem here. I’ll make us tea.

You’ll find many examples of Clangs nice diagnostic output in Chandler’s talk. Here is another one, as a little teaser:

struct A
{
  std::string _str1;
  std::string _str2;
};

struct AHasher
{
  std::size_t operator() (const A& a)
  {
    return std::tr1::hash()(a._str1) ^
      std::tr1::hash()(a._str2);
  }
};
...
typedef std::tr1::unordered_map<A, int> AMap;
...

What’s wrong with this code? Yes, exactly: the operator in AHasher must be const. Errors with const correctness are typical, easy-to-overlook kind of problems in day-to-day programming. GCCs reaction to something like that is that something discards qualifiers. This may be perfectly right, and after a while you even get used to it. But as you can see with Clang, you can do much better.

The following two screenshots directly compare GCCs and Clangs output compiling the code above. Because there is a template instantiation involved, GCC covers you in its typical wall of text, before it actually tells you what’s wrong (last line).

CLang’s output is much better formated, it shows you the template instantiation steps much more cleanly and in the last line it tells you to the point what is really wrong: …but method is not marked const. Yeah!