Unexpected RESTEasy application upgrade surprise

The setting

A few months ago we got to maintain a RESTEasy application running in a Wildfly 10 container. The application uses RESTEasy as both, server and client and contains a few custom interceptors and providers.

Now our client wants to move on to Wildfly 13 as deployment target. Most of the application works out-of-the-box or just by upgrading some dependencies in the new container but some critical parts like the REST client requests stopped working.

The investigation

After some digging through the error messages it became clear our interceptors and providers were not called anymore. What has changed? Wildfly 13 comes with RESTEasy 3.5.1 while we were using 3.0 in Wildfly 10. Looking at the upgrade documentation leaves us puzzled though:

RESTEasy 3.5 series is a spin-off of the old RESTEasy 3.0 series, featuring JAX-RS 2.1 implementation.

The reason why 3.5 comes from 3.0 instead of the 3.1 / 4.0 development streams is basically providing users with a selection of RESTEasy 4 critical / strategic new features, while ensuring full backward compatiblity. As a consequence, no major issues are expected when upgrading RESTEasy from 3.0.x to 3.5.x.

We are using the standard classpath scanning method which discovers annotated RESTEasy classes and registers them for the application. Trying to register them explicitly in the application yielded the message, that our providers are already registered:

RESTEASY002155: Provider class mypackage.MyProvider is already registered. 2nd registration is being ignored.

Scanning and registration seemed to just work alright. So what was happening here?

The resolution

After a bit more investigation we realized the issue was on the client side only! In Wildfly 10/RESTEasy 3.0 the providers were automatically registered for the client, too. This is not the case anymore in Wildfly 13/RESTEasy 3.5! You have to register them with the client either using the ResteasyClientBuilder or the ResteasyClient you are using like mentioned in the documentation:

Client client = new ResteasyClientBuilder() // Activate gzip compression on client:
                    .register(AcceptEncodingGZIPFilter.class)
                    .register(GZIPDecodingInterceptor.class)
                    .register(GZIPEncodingInterceptor.class)
                    .build();

This subtle change in (undocumented?) behaviour took several hours to debug. Nevertheless, we actually like the change because we prefer doing things explicitly instead of using some magic. So now it is clear what interceptors and providers our REST client is using.