A Game Optimization War Story

As our customers surely know, I’m not working here on fridays. This is because that’s the time I allocate to my side project, an arcade real-time strategy game called abstractanks. It is a passion project above all else, but of course, I am also learning a lot, much of which I can apply to my “day job” here as well. Today I want to share the story of how I optimized a critical bit of code in that game.

The Big Slowdown

While working on scripted missions, one main element I am using is to make a group of units attack when you enter an area (a.k.a. a zone-trigger). This seems easy enough, but was causing massive slowdowns as soon as the enemy group started moving. My average logic frame-time jumped from 0.3 ms to more than 1500 ms, which essentially makes the game unplayable. When seeing a performance problem, your first instinct should always be to profile it. So I booted up WPR/WPA and did just that. Once I had the profile, I followed the most-sampled path in the stack and found my way to the supposed culprit: the parking algorithm.

Context

When optimizing, you need as much context as you possible to find the best possible course of action. So let me explain how that algorithm fits into the broader picture.

Parking

My main game-mechanic is moving around your units. You do this by selecting a group and then clicking somewhere on the map to issue the move-order. In addition to path-finding process, this also runs an algorithm I call park-planning (as in parking a car). It makes sure that the units know to position themselves around the target point in a roughly circular shape once they arrive. It is essential to the interaction of this mechanic with the capturing of objectives, which are circular as well. Before this was implemented, the units would just decelerate after passing the target point. This caused them to “overshot” and miss the objectives, which was frustrating to the players: they clicked in the right place, but the units would not stop there, but slightly behind it. To make things worse, units arriving later, would bump into those that were already there, further pushing them away and clumping up.

AI Moving

In my particular case, the AI enemy was repeatedly issuing move-orders to close in on the intruder – the player. Since the player group usually also moved, the AI was trying to adapt by changing the move order every frame (effectively working at around 2000 APMs).

Diving into the code

My park-planning implementation is divided into two steps: finding enough parking spots, and then assigning units to it. The profiler was showing that the first part was the problem while the assignment was negligible in terms of run-time. Historically, the first step was reusing and extending some code I first wrote for spawning units, which worked like this:

optional<v2> GameWorld::FindFreePosition(v2 Center, std::vector<v2> const& Occupied)
{
  auto CheckPosition = [&](v2 Candiate)
  {
    if (!IsPassable(Candidate))
      return false;

    if (OverlapsWith(Occupied))
      return false;

    return !FriendlyUnitOccupies(Candidate);   
  };

  if (CheckPosition(Center))
    return Center;

  auto Radius = UNIT_SIZE;
  while (Radius < MAX_SEARCH_RADIUS)
  {
    // Roll a random starting angle
    auto AngleOffset = RandomAngle();
    auto Angle = 0.f;
    while (Angle < 2*Pi)
    {
      auto Candidate = Center + AngleVector(Angle + AngleOffset)*Radius;
      if (CheckPosition(Candidate))
        return Candidate;

      // Move along this circle
      Angle += 2*Pi*Radius / UNIT_SIZE / OVERSAMPLING_FACTOR;
    }

    // Increase the Radius
    Radius += UNIT_SIZE;
  }
  return none;  
}

Note that all the functions in the CheckPosition lambda are “size aware” and respect the UNIT_SIZE – so they are slightly more complex than what the pseudo-code here would have you believe.
The occupied parameter was added for the parking-position finding. It successively fills up the std::vector with positions and uses them once it found enough.

Back to the profiling results: They were showing that most of the time was spent in the FriendlyUnitOccupies, followed by IsPassable and and then OverlapsWith. FriendlyUnitOccupies dominated the time by about 8x times the rest. That function uses a quad-tree to accelerate spatial queries for other units.

Next steps

Obviously, this code uses pretty simplistic approach to the problem – basically just brute-forcing it. But that’s good now there are many different paths to take, many optimization opportunities. My approach was a relatively simple change that got the frame time back down below 1 ms, but before I did that, I considered many and tested a few other different approaches. I will talk about that in detail in my next post. How would you approach this?

One thought on “A Game Optimization War Story

  1. Pingback: Game Optimization Resolved | Schneide Blog

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