Putting toilet books into practice

I’m reading a lot of books and based on my profession and interests, my list includes many software development and IT books. I want to share how I manage my reading and give some recommendations for a special type of book that I call “toilet book”.

Three books at once

The human mind is a peculiar thing. You’ve probably experienced the effect of getting up to perform some minor task in an other room only to arrive there with no recollection about what you wanted to do. Between the thoughts of “ok, let’s do this now!” and “why did I go here?”, just a few seconds have passed, but another aspect has changed dramatically: your geographic position. As a side note: If you don’t know what I’m talking about, consider yourself lucky. Our memory is often bound to the geographic position and changes when we move. If you want to remember what your forgotten task was, try returning to your original location. You’ll often see me walking around the same way twice within seconds. That’s when I have to rewind my location-based memory.

A particular use case where I leverage my location-based memory is when I read books. I often read three books at once, but strictly separated by location:

  • The first book is the “leisure book“: I will only read it at comfortable locations like the couch, in the sun on the balcony or in the bathtub. This book is often fiction or has at least nothing to do with IT.
  • The second book is the “travel book“: You’ll seldom see me travelling without a book and just a few minutes of tram are sufficient to read some pages. This book is often IT-based, because I read it on my commute to and from work and sometimes in my lunch break.
  • The third book is the “toilet book“: You’ll never see me reading this book, because it is stored besides my toilet and is exclusively read there. Books that are suitable for this task often have a special structure that aligns with the circumstances. More on this in a moment.

By having a clear separation by location for the three books, I’m able to keep their content separated and switch from one reading context to the next without effort. It happens naturally if I refrain from reading my travel book at home or taking my leisure book on the train.

The structure of a toilet book

A good toilet book has a special structure that accommodates for the special timing of a toilet visit. If you spend two minutes on the toilet, the book should have chapters or at least paragraphs that can be read in two minute intervals. Ideally, the book is specifically designed to contain short chapters on different topics that have no strong over-arching story. A typical example of a good non-IT toilet book are comic books like Calvin & Hobbes, The Peanuts or any other comic series that has small self-contained comic strips. You read one or two strips, are amused and interrupt again without having to memorize a complex context. Good toilet books allow for short, context-free reading sessions.

A collection of worthwhile toilet books

Over the years, I’ve read some toilet books with IT and software development topics and want to share my list of books that I enjoyed reading in this fashion:

In short, for me, calling a book a “toilet book” is not a derogatory taunt, but a neutral description that this book is structured in a way to support repeated short-time reading sessions. For me, these books are a good choice for a tertiary reading track.

A call for proposals

Right now, my reading list of good IT toilet books is rather short. If you happen to know a book that fits my description, I would be thankful for a hint in the comments. Thank you!

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