For what the javascript!

The setting

We are developing and maintaining an important web application for one of our clients. Our application scrapes a web page and embeds our own content into that page frame.

One day our client told us of an additional block of elements at the bottom of each page. The block had a heading “Image Credits” and a broken image link strangely labeled “inArray”. We did not change anything on our side and the new blocks were not part of the HTML code of the pages.

Ok, so some new Javascript code must be the source of these strange elements on our pages.

The investigation

I started the investigation using the development tools of the browser (using F12). A search for the string “Image Credits” instantly brought me to the right place: A Javascript function called on document.ready(). The code was basically getting all images with a copyright attribute and put the findings in an array with the text as the key and the image url as the value. Then it would iterate over the array and add the copyright information at the bottom of each page.

But wait! Our array was empty and we had no images with copyright attributes. Still the block would be put out. I verified all this using the debugger in the browser and was a bit puzzled at first, especially by the strange name “inArray” that sounded more like code than some copyright information.

The cause

Then I looked at the iteration and it struck me like lightning: The code used for (name in copyrightArray) to iterate over the elements. Sounds correct, but it is not! Now we have to elaborate a bit, especially for all you folks without a special degree in Javascript coding:

In Javascript there is no distinct notion of associative arrays but you can access all enumerable properties of an object using square brackets (taken from Mozillas Javascript docs):

var string1 = "";
var object1 = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3};

for (var property1 in object1) {
  string1 = string1 + object1[property1];
}

console.log(string1);
// expected output: "123"

In the case of an array the indices are “just enumerable properties with integer names and are otherwise identical to general object properties“.

So in our case we had an array object with a length of 0 and a property called inArray. Where did that come from? Digging further revealed that one of our third-party libraries added a function to the array prototype like so:

Array.prototype.inArray = function (value) {
  var i;
  for (i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
    if (this[i] === value) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
};

The solution

Usually you would iterate over an array using the integer index (old school) or better using the more modern and readable for…of (which also works on other iterable types). In this case that does not work because we do not use integer indices but string properties. So you have to use Object.keys().forEach() or check with hasOwnProperty() if in your for…in loop if the property is inherited or not to avoid getting unwanted properties of prototypes.

The takeaways

Iteration in Javascript is hard! See this lengthy discussion…The different constructs are named quite similar an all have subtle differences in behaviour. In addition, libraries can mess with the objects you think you know. So finally some advice from me:

  • Arrays are only true arrays with positive integer indices/property names!
  • Do not mess with the prototypes of well known objects, like our third-party library did…
  • Use for…of to iterate over true arrays or other iterables
  • Do not use associative arrays if other options are available. If you do, make sure to check if the properties are own properties and enumerable.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.