Upgrade with a twist

A few weeks ago, I heard a nice story about the hidden cost of new features. Imagine a website, driven by a content management system, consisting of text, pictures and fancy styling. When the content management system gets an update, the website developer takes a look at the release notes and finds that a lot of new and cool features are included that you’ll get for free once you update.

So he updates the site, tries it out and publishes it onto the web. A few days later, the customer and owner of the website sends a bug report of some arbitrarily flipped images. There are just short of a hundred images on the website and a handful of them now show up upside down.

Who would update a website and randomly rotate some images?

Why would a content management system decide that excatly these images need a spin?

The answer is not as obvious as one might think.

The latest cause of the effect was a change of the imaging library the content management system uses to deliver the image content. It got upgraded to a new engine that essentially does the same thing as the old one: Take the image file content and put it on the web. But, it does it more thoroughly.

One feature of JPEG images are the EXIF metadata properties. Examples of useful properties are the photography time, the geolocation or the camera model. Some cameras add even more information into the metadata, like exposure time or the camera’s orientation (rotation) during the photographing process. There are cameras that notice if you hold them upside down and store this circumstance into the picture.

Then, there are imaging libraries that just take the pixels and put them on the screen. And there are libraries that know about their domain and read the EXIF metadata, interpret the rotation data and accomodate for that fact. Because, who would like to look at pictures that are displayed totally wrong?

The first version of the content management system’s imaging library didn’t care much about metadata. The new version takes rotation into account.

So, the cause of the suddenly rotated pictures originates with the photographer that happened to work during a workout session or in australia. This fact was registered and stored by the camera and promply ignored by the picture editing software and the earlier content management system. It was rediscovered only when the new version went live.

For the customer, this is a random regression. It worked just fine all those years! For the developer, this is a minefield. Every picture could contain an evil rotation information that gets applied someday.

For a security engineer, this is a harmless but perfect example of a persistence attack. You embed malicious payloads into data that do nothing for a long time, but are activated suddenly, without outside intervention, by an unrelated change of system parts towards a “lucky” constellation.

Guess what you can embed into EXIF metadata, too? Javascript or any other form of executable code. And then you wait.

To end this blog entry on a light note, sometimes the payload may just happen to be your last name – True!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.