Windows 10 quality of life features

Starting with Windows 10 Microsoft switched from big-bang releases of its operating system to so called rolling releases: They release new features and improvements in regular intervals – once or twice a year – without changing the product name.

The great thing is that users get the improvements made by Microsofts engineers much sooner than in the past where you had to wait several years for a big “service pack” to arrive or even a new major release of Windows like 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 and finally 10 (I am leaving out the dark times on purpose 😉).

The bad thing is that it is harder to see what version or release you are running. Of course there is a (less visible) name for every Windows release. This version or codename sometimes gets mentioned on support pages or in blog posts because functionality of Window 10 can change significantly between these rolling feature updates. And sometimes you may run some app or tool that tells you need Windows 10 2004 or higher.

What version of Window 10 am I running?

I know of two simple ways to find out what version of Windows 10 you are running currently:

  1. Running the tool winver
  2. Opening the Settings -> System -> Info page

Why does it matter?

Another downside is that users often are not aware of new stuff added to their operating system. And Microsoft does an awful job promoting the changes and improvements!

Of course there are announcements about the big things after upgrading your operating system to the next feature level. And Microsoft uses these for marketing its own apps and services. They slap you their new Edge-browser in the face on every occasion and try to trick you in creating a Microsoft account. It is absolutely not obvious how to use Windows without a Microsoft account like the decades before. Skip the process here, continue without and risk your live…

On the other hand they really improve their software and slowly but steadily round the rough edges of their system. The UIs for environment variables are finally quite usable.

Now back to the main theme of the post: There are some hidden gems built into Windows 10 that I learned of only lately and I think are vastly underadvertised – unlike Microsoft’s marketing of their big products.

Built-in screen recorder

Ok, many gamers may know it because it Windows briefly displays the shortcut Win+G when starting a game. It is not only usable for games but you can record any window, capture application sounds and record your voice. You can easily record your own screencasts and video tutorials using this built-in solution.

Built-in clipboard manager

How often did you wish to be able copy multiple items and choose one of the last few copied elements when pasting? While such clipboard managers have been around for a long time and sometimes provide tons of useful features Windows 10 has a simple one built-in. Just press Win+V instead of Ctrl+V to paste your clipboard entry and you will get a list of the copied items to choose from.

Built-in screenshot/snipping tool

Many people may know the old way of making screenshots using the oddly labeled PrtScr-key (sometimes also PrntScrn or simply Print), opening a painting application like MS paint and pasting the image using Ctrl+V. Well, Microsoft improved this workflow a lot by including a snipping tool that you can activate using Win+Shift+S. This tool lets you select either a rectangular or free-form region, a window or an entire screen to capture. After doing that you get a notification allowing you to make modifications to the capture and save it to disk.

On-screen emoji-keyboard

Just a little helper in these modern social media times is the on-screen emoji-keyboard. Using Win+. you can activate it, browse tons of common emojis and enter them into you messages and texts 🐱‍🏍🤘.

Windows Terminal

Ok, this last but not least one is not (yet) built-in and mostly interesting for developers and power users. Nevertheless, I think it is noteworthy that Microsoft finally built a capable terminal application with modern features like multiple tabs, full unicode and font support, customizable background with blur and the ability to host different shells like the old and trusted command prompt CMD, the newer PowerShell and WSL. You can find it in the Microsoft store for free.

Conclusion

While releases of Windows 10 are more subtle than past new Windows releases many things change both under the hood and user visible. Every once in a while something you missed for years or installed third-party tools for may be added without you knowing. That’s another reason why talking to colleagues and friends and practices like pair-programming and brown-bag meetings are so valuable for sharing knowledge and experience.

I hope there is something for you in my findings of hidden windows gems. If you have some Windows 10 features you discovered and really like, feel free to leave them in the comments. I will gladly try them out!

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