Using parameterized docker builds

Docker is a great addition to you DevOps toolbox. Sometimes you may want to build several similar images using the same Dockerfile. That’s where parameterized docker builds come in:

They provide the ability to provide configuration values at image build time. Do not confuse this with environment variables when running the container! We used parameterized builds for example to build images for creating distribution-specific packages of native libraries and executables.

Our use case

We needed to package some proprietary native programs for several linux distribution version, in our case openSuse Leap. Build ARGs allow us to use a single Dockerfile but build several images and run them to build the packages for each distribution version. This can be easily achieved using so-called multi-configuration jobs in  the jenkins continuous integration server. But let us take a look at the Dockerfile first:

ARG LEAP_VERSION=15.1
FROM opensuse/leap:$LEAP_VERSION
ARG LEAP_VERSION=15.1

# add our target repository
RUN zypper ar http://our-private-rpm-repository.company.org/repo/leap-$LEAP_VERSION/ COMPANY_REPO

# install some pre-requisites
RUN zypper -n --no-gpg-checks refresh && zypper -n install rpm-build gcc-c++

WORKDIR /buildroot

CMD rpmbuild --define "_topdir `pwd`" -bb packaging/project.spec

Notice the ARG instruction defines a parameter name and a default value. That allows us to configure the image at build time using the --build-arg command line flag. Now we can build a docker image for Leap 15.0 using a command like:

docker build -t project-build --build-arg LEAP_VERSION=15.0 -f docker/Dockerfile .

In our multi-configuration jobs we call docker build with the variable from the axis definition to build several images in one job using the same Dockerfile.

A gotcha

As you may have noticed we have put the same ARG instruction twice in the Dockerfile: once before the FROM instruction and another time after FROM. This is because the build args are cleared after each FROM instruction. So beware in multi-stage builds, too. For more information see the docker documentation and this discussion. This had cost us quite some time as it was not as clearly documented at the time.

Conclusion

Parameterized builds allow for easy configuration of your Docker images at image build time. This increases flexibility and reduces duplication like maintaining several almost identical Dockerfiles. For runtime container configuration provide environment variables  to the docker run command.

Lombok-Tooling surprise

Some months ago we took over development and maintenance of a Java EE-based web application. The project has ok-code for the most part and uses mostly standard libraries from the Java ecosystem. One of them is lombok which strives to reduce the boilerplate code needed and make the code more readable and concise.

Fortunately there is a plugin for IntelliJ, our favourite Java IDE that understands lombok and allows for easy navigation and code hints. For example you can jump from getMyField() to the lombok-annotated backing field of the getter and so on.

This sounds very good but some day we were debugging a weird behaviour. An abstract class contained a special implementation of a Map as its field and was annotated with @Getter and @Setter. But somehow the type and contents of the Map changed without calling the setter.

What was happening here? After a quite some time digging spent in the debugger we noticed, that the getter was overridden in a subclass. Normally, IntelliJ shows an Icon with navigation options beside overridden/overriding methods. Unfortunately for us not for lombok annotations!

Consider the following code:

public class SuperClass {

    @Getter
    private List strings = new ArrayList();

    public List getInts() {
        return new ArrayList();
    }
}

public class NotSoSuperClass extends SuperClass {
    @Override
    public List getStrings() {
        return Arrays.asList("Many", "Strings");
    }

    @Override
    public List getInts() {
        return Arrays.asList(1,2,3);
    }
}

The corresponding code in IntelliJ looks like this:

2019-08-08 10_54_49-lombok-plugin-surprise-demo

Notice that IntelliJ puts a nice little icon next to the line number where the class or a methods is subclassed/overridden. But not so for the lombok getter. This tiny detail lead to quite a surprise and cost us some hours.

Of course you can argue, that the code design is broken, but hey, that was the state and the tools are there to help you discover such weird quirks.

We opened an issue for the lombok IntelliJ plugin, so maybe it will be enhanced to provide such additional tooling information to be on par with plain old java code.

 

Debugging Web Pages for iOS

Web developers use browser tools like the Web Inspector in Chrome and Safari or the Developer Tools in Firefox to develop, debug and test web pages. In Safari you have to enable the developer menu first: Safari -> Preferences… -> Advanced -> Show develop menu in menu bar

All these tools offer modes where you can display the page layout at various screen sizes. In Safari this is called the Responsive Design Mode and can be found in the Develop menu. This is essential for checking the page layout for mobile devices. There are however some differences in behaviour, which can only be tested on the real devices or in a simulator. For example, dropdown menus can trigger a wheel selector on mobile devices, while the desktop browser renders them as regular dropdown menus, even in responsive design mode.

Here are some tips for debugging web pages for iOS devices in the simulator:

Using Web Inspector with the iOS Simulator

Within the mobile Safari browser you can’t simply open the Web Inspector console as you would do when developing a web page using a desktop browser. But you can connect the Web Inspector of your desktop Safari to the mobile Safari browser instance running in the iOS simulator:

  • Start the iOS simulator from Xcode: Xcode -> Open Developer Tool -> Simulator
  • Select the desired device: Hardware -> Device -> e.g. iOS 12.1 -> iPhone SE
  • Open the web page in Safari within the simulator
  • Open the desktop version of Safari

In Safari’s Develop menu the simulator now shows up as a device, e.g. “Simulator – iPhone SE – iOS 12.1 (16B91)”. The web page you opened in the simulator should be listed as submenu item. If you click this menu item the Web Inspector opens. It’s now connected to the simulated Safari instance and you can debug the mobile variant of your web page.

Workaround for Clearing the Cache

When using a desktop web browser one can easily bypass the local browser cache when reloading a web page by holding the shift key while pressing the reload button. Sometimes this is necessary to see changes in effect while developing a web application. However, this doesn’t work in Safari running within the iOS emulator. There’s a little workaround: You can open the web page in an incognito tab, which means the cache is cleared each time you close the tab and re-open it again in a new incognito tab.

Automated vulnerability checking of software dependencies

The OWASP organization is focused on improving the security of software systems and regularly publishes lists with security risks, such as the OWASP Top 10 Most Critical Web Application Security Risks or the Mobile Top 10 Security Risks. Among these are common attack vectors like command injections, buffer overruns, stack buffer overflow attacks and SQL injections.

When developing software you have to be aware of these in order to avoid and prevent them. If your project depends on third-party software components, such as open source libraries, you have to assess those dependencies for security risks as well. It is not enough to do this just once. You have to check them regularly and watch for any known, publicly disclosed, vulnerabilities in these dependencies.

Publicly known information-security vulnerabilities are tracked according to the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) standard. Each vulnerability is assigned an ID, for example CVE-2009-2704, and published in the National Vulnerability Database (NVD) by the U.S. government. Here’s an example for such an entry.

Automated Dependency Checking

There are tools and services to automatically check the dependencies of your project against these publicly known vulnerabilities, for example the OWASP Dependency Check or the Sonatype OSS Index. In order to use them your project has to use a dependency manager, for example Maven in the Java world or NuGet in the .NET ecosystem.

Here’s how to integrate the OWASP Dependency Check into your Maven based project, by adding the following plugin to the pom.xml file:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.owasp</groupId>
  <artifactId>dependency-check-maven</artifactId>
  <version>5.0.0-M1</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <goals>
        <goal>check</goal>
      </goals>
    </execution>
  </executions>
</plugin>

When you run the Maven goal dependency-check:check you might see an output like this:

One or more dependencies were identified with known vulnerabilities in Project XYZ:

jboss-j2eemgmt-api_1.1_spec-1.0.1.Final.jar (pkg:maven/org.jboss.spec.javax.management.j2ee/jboss-j2eemgmt-api_1.1_spec@1.0.1.Final, cpe:2.3:a:sun:j2ee:1.0.1:*:*:*:*:*:*:*) : CVE-2009-2704, CVE-2009-2705
...

The output tells you which version of a dependency is affected and the CVE ID. Now you can use this ID to look it up in the NVD database and inform yourself about the potential dangers of the vulnerability and take action, like updating the dependency if there is a newer version, which addresses the vulnerability.

Using Ansible vault for sensitive data

We like using ansible for our automation because it has minimum requirements for the target machines and all around infrastructure. You need nothing more than ssh and python with some libraries. In contrast to alternatives like puppet and chef you do not need special server and client programs running all the time and communicating with each other.

The problem

When setting up remote machines and deploying software systems for your customers you will often have to use sensitive data like private keys, passwords and maybe machine or account names. On the one hand you want to put your automation scripts and their data under version control and use them from your continuous integration infrastructure. On the other hand you do not want to spread the secrets of your customers all around your infrastructure and definately never ever in your source code repository.

The solution

Ansible supports encrypting sensitive data and using them in playbooks with the concept of vaults and the accompanying commands. Setting it up requires some work but then usage is straight forward and works seamlessly.

The high-level conversion process is the following:

  1. create a directory for the data to substitute on a host or group basis
  2. extract all sensitive variables into vars.yml
  3. copy vars.yml to vault.yml
  4. prefix variables in vault.yml with vault_
  5. use vault variables in vars.yml

Then you can encrypt vault.yml using the ansible-vault command providing a password.

All you have to do subsequently is to provide the vault password along with your usual playbook commands. Decryption for playbook execution is done transparently on-the-fly for you, so you do not need to care about decryption and encryption of your vault unless you need to update the data in there.

The step-by-step guide

Suppose we want work on a target machine run by your customer but providing you access via ssh. You do not want to store your ssh user name and password in your repository but want to be able to run the automation scripts unattended, e.g. from a jenkins job. Let us call the target machine ceres.

So first you setup the directory structure by creating a directory for the target machine called $ansible_script_root$/host_vars/ceres.

To log into the machine we need two sensitive variables: ansible_user and ansible_ssh_pass. We put them into a file called $ansible_script_root$/host_vars/ceres/vars.yml:

ansible_user: our_customer_ssh_account
ansible_ssh_pass: our_target_machine_pwd

Then we copy vars.yml to vault.yml and prefix the variables with vault_ resulting in $ansible_script_root$/host_vars/ceres/vault.yml with content of:

vault_ansible_user: our_customer_ssh_account
vault_ansible_ssh_pass: our_target_machine_pwd

Now we use these new variables in our vars.xml like this:

ansible_user: "{{ vault_ansible_user }}"
ansible_ssh_pass: "{{ vault_ansible_ssh_pass }}"

Now it is time to encrypt the vault using the command

ANSIBLE_VAULT_PASS="ourpwd" ansible-vault encrypt host_vars/ceres/vault.yml

resulting a encrypted vault that can be put in source control. It looks something like

$ANSIBLE_VAULT;1.1;AES256
35323233613539343135363737353931636263653063666535643766326566623461636166343963
3834323363633837373437626532366166366338653963320a663732633361323264316339356435
33633861316565653461666230386663323536616535363639383666613431663765643639383666
3739356261353566650a383035656266303135656233343437373835313639613865636436343865
63353631313766633535646263613564333965343163343434343530626361663430613264336130
63383862316361363237373039663131363231616338646365316236336362376566376236323339
30376166623739643261306363643962353534376232663631663033323163386135326463656530
33316561376363303339383365333235353931623837356362393961356433313739653232326638
3036

Using your playbook looks similar to before, you just need to provide the vault password using one of several options like specifying a password file, environment variable or interactive input. In our example we just use the environment variable inline:

ANSIBLE_VAULT_PASS="ourpwd" ansible-playbook -i inventory work-on-customer-machines.yml

After setting up your environment appropriately with a password file and the ANSIBLE_VAULT_PASSWORD_FILE environment variable your playbook commands are exactly the same like without using a vault.

Conclusion

The ansible vault feature allows you to safely store and use sensitive data in your infrastructure without changing too much using your automation scripts.

Analysing a React web app using SonarQube

Many developers especially from the Java world may know the code analysis platform SonarQube (formerly SONAR). While its focus was mostly integration all the great analysis tools for Java the modular architecture allows plugging tools for other languages to provide linter results and code coverage under the same web interface.

We are a polyglot bunch and are using more and more React in addition to our Java, C++, .Net and “what not” projects. Of course we would like the same quality overview for these JavaScript projects as we are used to in other ecosystems. So I tried SonarQube for react.

The start

Using SonarQube to analyse a JavaScript project is as easy as for the other languages: Just provide a sonar-project.properties file specifying the sources and some paths for analysis results and there you go. It may look similar to the following for a create-react-app:

sonar.projectKey=myproject:webclient
sonar.projectName=Webclient for my cool project
sonar.projectVersion=0.3.0

#sonar.language=js
sonar.sources=src
sonar.exclusions=src/tests/**
sonar.tests=src/tests
sonar.sourceEncoding=UTF-8

#sonar.test.inclusions=src/tests/**/*.test.js
sonar.coverage.exclusions=src/tests/**

sonar.junit.reportPaths=test-results/test-report.junit.xml
sonar.javascript.lcov.reportPaths=coverage/lcov.info

For the coverage you need to add some settings to your package.json, too:

{ ...
"devDependencies": {
"enzyme": "^3.3.0",
"enzyme-adapter-react-16": "^1.1.1",
"eslint": "^4.19.1",
"eslint-plugin-react": "^7.7.0",
"jest-junit": "^3.6.0"
},
"jest": {
"collectCoverageFrom": [
"src/**/*.{js,jsx}",
"!**/node_modules/**",
"!build/**"
],
"coverageReporters": [
"lcov",
"text"
]
},
"jest-junit": {
"output": "test-results/test-report.junit.xml"
},
...
}

This is all nice but the set of built-in rules for JavaScript is a bit thin and does not fit React apps nicely.

ESLint to the recue

But you can make SonarQube use ESLint and thus become more useful.

First you have to install the ESLint Plugin for SonarQube from github.

Second you have to setup ESLint to your liking using eslint --init in your project. That results in a eslintrc.js similar to this:

module.exports = {
  'env': {
    'browser': true,
    'commonjs': true,
    'es6': true
  },
  'extends': 'eslint:recommended',
  'parserOptions': {
    'ecmaFeatures': {
      'experimentalObjectRestSpread': true,
      'jsx': true
    },
    'sourceType': 'module'
  },
  'plugins': [
    'react'
  ],
  'rules': {
    'indent': [
      'error',
      2
    ],
    'linebreak-style': [
      'error',
      'unix'
    ],
    'quotes': [
      'error',
      'single'
    ],
    'semi': [
      'error',
      'always'
    ]
  }
};

Lastly enable the ESLint ruleset for your project in sonarqube and look at the results. You may need to tune one thing or another but you will get some useful static analysis helping you to improve your code quality further.

Ansible in Jenkins

Ansible is a powerful tool for automation of your IT infrastructure. In contrast to chef or puppet it does not need much infrastructure like a server and client (“agent”) programs on your target machines. We like to use it for keeping our servers and desktop machines up-to-date and provisioned in a defined, repeatable and self-documented way.

As of late ansible has begun to replace our different, custom-made – but already automated – deployment processes we implemented using different tools like ant scripts run by jenkins-jobs. The natural way of using ansible for deployment in our current infrastructure would be using it from jenkins with the jenkins ansible plugin.

Even though the plugin supports the “Global Tool Configuration” mechanism and automatic management of several ansible installations it did not work out of the box for us:

At first, the executable path was not set correctly. We managed to fix that but then the next problem arose: Our standard build slaves had no jinja2 (python templating library) installed. Sure, that are problems you can easily fix if you decide so.

For us, it was too much tinkering and snowflaking our build slaves to be feasible and we took another route, that you can consider: Running ansible from an docker image.

We already have a host for running docker containers attached to jenkins so our current state of deployment with ansible roughly consists of a Dockerfile and a Jenkins job to run the container.

The Dockerfile is as simple as


FROM ubuntu:14.04
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update && apt-get -y dist-upgrade && apt-get -y install software-properties-common
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-add-repository ppa:ansible/ansible-2.4
RUN DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get update && apt-get -y install ansible

# Setup work dir
WORKDIR /project/provisioning

# Copy project directory into container
COPY . /project

# Deploy the project
CMD ansible-playbook -i inventory deploy-project.yml

And the jenkins build step to actually run the deployment looks like


docker build -t project-deploy .
docker run project-deploy

That way we can tailor our deployment machine to conveniently run our ansible playbooks for the specific project without modifying our normal build slave setups and adding complexity on their side. All the tinkering with the jenkins ansible plugin is unnecessary going this way and relying on docker and what the container provides for running ansible.