Creating a GPS network service using a Raspberry Pi – Part 2

In the last article we learnt how to install and access a GPS module in a Raspberry Pi. Next, we want to write a network service that extracts the current location data – latitude, longitude and altitude – from the serial port.

Basics

We use Perl to write a CGI-script running within an Apache 2; both should be installed on the Raspberry Pi. To access the serial port from Perl, we need to include the module Device::SerialPort. Besides, we use the module JSON to generate the HTTP response.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Device::SerialPort;
use JSON;
use CGI::Carp qw(fatalsToBrowser);

Interacting with the serial port

To interact with the serial port in Perl, we instantiate Device::SerialPort and configure it according to our hardware. Then, we can read the data sent by our hardware via device->read(…), for example as follows:

my $device = Device::SerialPort->new('...') or die "Can't open serial port!";
//configuration
...
($count, $result) = $device->read(255);

For the Sparqee GPSv1.0 module, the device can be configured as shown below:

our $device = '/dev/ttyAMA0';
our $baudrate = 9600;

sub GetGPSDevice {
 my $gps = Device::SerialPort->new($device) or return (1, "Can't open serial port '$device'!");
    $gps->baudrate($baudrate);
    $gps->parity('none');
    $gps->databits(8);
    $gps->stopbits(1);
    $gps->write_settings or return (1, 'Could not write settings for serial port device!');
    return (0, $gps);
}

Finding the location line

As described in the previous blog post, the GPS module sends a continuous stream of GPS data; here is an explanation for the single components.

$GPGSA,A,3,17,09,28,08,26,07,15,,,,,,2.4,1.4,1.9*.6,1.7,2.0*3C
$GPRMC,031349.000,A,3355.3471,N,11751.7128,W,0.00,143.39,210314,,,A*76
$GPGGA,031350.000,3355.3471,N,11751.7128,W,1,06,1.7,112.2,M,-33.7,M,,0000*6F
$GPGSA,A,3,17,09,28,08,07,15,,,,,,,2.6,1.7,2.0*3C
$GPGSV,3,1,12,17,67,201,30,09,62,112,28,28,57,022,21,08,55,104,20*7E
$GPGSV,3,2,12,07,25,124,22,15,24,302,30,11,17,052,26,26,49,262,05*73
$GPGSV,3,3,12,30,51,112,31,57,31,122,,01,24,073,,04,05,176,*7E
$GPRMC,031350.000,A,3355.3471,N,11741.7128,W,0.00,143.39,210314,,,A*7E
$GPGGA,031351.000,3355.3471,N,11741.7128,W,1,07,1.4,112.2,M,-33.7,M,,0000*6C

We are only interested in the information about latitude, longitude and altitude, which is part of the line starting with $GPGGA. Assuming that the first parameter contains a correctly configured device, the following subroutine reads the data stream sent by the GPS module, extracts the relevant line and returns it. In detail, it searches for the string $GPGGA in the data stream, buffers all data sent afterwards until the next line starts, and returns the buffer content.

# timeout in seconds
our $timeout = 10;

sub ExtractLocationLine {
    my $gps = $_[0];
    my $count;
    my $result;
    my $buffering = 0;
    my $buffer = '';
    my $limit = time + $timeout;
    while (1) {
        if (time >= $limit) {
           return '';
        }
        ($count, $result) = $gps->read(255);
        if ($count <= 0) {
            next;
        }
        if ($result =~ /^\$GPGGA/) {
            $buffering = 1;
        }
        if ($buffering) {
            my $part = (split /\n/, $result)[0];
            $buffer .= $part;
        }
        if ($buffering and ($result =~ m/\n/g)) {
            return $buffer;
        }
    }
}

Parsing the location line

The $GPGGA-line contains more information than we need. With regular expressions, we can extract the relevant data: $1 is the latitude, $2 is the longitude and $3 is the altitude.

sub ExtractGPSData {
    $_[0] =~ m/\$GPGGA,\d+\.\d+,(\d+\.\d+,[NS]),(\d+\.\d+,[WE]),\d,\d+,\d+\.\d+,(\d+\.\d+,M),.*/;
    return ($1, $2, $3);
}

Putting everything together

Finally, we convert the found data to JSON and print it to the standard output stream in order to write the HTTP response of the CGI script.

sub GetGPSData {
    my ($error, $gps) = GetGPSDevice;
    if ($error) {
        return ToError($gps);
    }
    my $location = ExtractLocationLine($gps);
    if (not $location) {
        return ToError("Timeout: Could not obtain GPS data within $timeout seconds.");
    }
    my ($latitude, $longitude, $altitude) = ExtractGPSData($location);
    if (not ($latitude and $longitude and $altitude)) {
        return ToError("Error extracting GPS data, maybe no lock attained?\n$location");
    }
    return to_json({
        'latitude' => $latitude,
        'longitude' => $longitude,
        'altitude' => $altitude
    });
}

sub ToError {
    return to_json({'error' => $_[0]});
}

binmode(STDOUT, ":utf8");
print "Content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8\n\n".GetGPSData."\n";

Configuration

To execute the Perl script with a HTTP request, we have to place it in the cgi-bin directory; in our case we saved the file at /usr/lib/cgi-bin/gps.pl. Before accessing it, you can ensure that the Apache is configured correctly by checking the file /etc/apache2/sites-available/default; it should contain the following section:

ScriptAlias /cgi-bin/ /usr/lib/cgi-bin/
<Directory "/usr/lib/cgi-bin">
    AllowOverride None
    Options +ExecCGI -MultiViews +SymLinksIfOwnerMatch
    Order allow,deny
    Allow from all
</Directory>

Furthermore, the permissions of the script file have to be adjusted, otherwise the Apache user will not be able to execute it:

sudo chown www-data:www-data /usr/lib/cgi-bin/gps.pl
sudo chmod 0755 /usr/lib/cgi-bin/gps.pl

We also have to add the Apache user to the user group dialout, otherwise it cannot read from the serial port. For this change to come into effect the Raspberry Pi has to be rebooted.

sudo adduser www-data dialout
sudo reboot

Finally, we can check if the script is working by accessing the page <IP address>/cgi-bin/gps.pl. If the Raspberry Pi has no GPS reception, you should see the following output:

{"error":"Error extracting GPS data, maybe no lock attained?\n$GPGGA,121330.326,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*53\r"}

When the Raspberry Pi receives GPS data, they should be given in the browser:

{"longitude":"11741.7128,W","latitude":"3355.3471,N","altitude":"112.2,M"}

Last, if you see the following message, you should check whether the Apache user was correctly added to the group dialout.

{"error":"Can't open serial port '/dev/ttyAMA0'!"}

Conclusion

In the last article, we focused on the hardware and its installation. In this part, we learnt how to access the serial port via Perl, wrote a CGI script that extracts and delivers the location information and used the Apache web server to make the data available via network.

Creating a GPS network service using a Raspberry Pi – Part 1

Using sensors is a task we often face in our company. This article series consisting of two parts will show how to install a GPS module in a Raspberry Pi and to provide access to the GPS data over ethernet. This guide is based on a Raspberry Pi Model B Revision 2 and the GPS shield “Sparqee GPSv1.0”. In the first part, we will demonstrate the setup of the hardware and the retrieval of GPS data within the Raspberry Pi.

Hardware configuration

The GPS shield can be connected to the Raspberry Pi by using the pins in the top left corner of the board.

Raspberry Pi B Rev. 2 (Source: Wikipedia)

Raspberry Pi B Rev. 2 (Source: Wikipedia)

The Sparqee GPS shield possesses five pins whose purpose can be found on the product page:

Pin Function Voltage I/O
GND Ground connection 0 I
RX Receive 2.5-6V I
TX Transmit 2.5-6V O
2.5-6V Power input 2.5-6V I
EN Enable power module 2.5-6V I
Sparqee GPSv1.0

Sparqee GPSv1.0

We used the following pin configuration for connecting the GPS shield:

GPS Shield Raspberry Pi Pin-Nummer
GND GND 9
RX GPIO14 / UART0 TX 8
TX GPIO15 / UART0 RX 10
2.5-6V +3V3 OUT 1
EN +3V3 OUT 17

You can see the corresponding pin numbers on the Raspberry board in the graphic below. A more detailed guide for the functionality of the different pins can be found here.

Relevant pins of the Raspberry Pi

Relevant pins of the Raspberry Pi

After attaching the GPS module, our Raspberry Pi looks like this:

Attaching the GPS shield to the Raspberry

Attaching the GPS shield to the Raspberry

 

GPS data retrieval

The Raspberry GPS communicates with the Sparqee GPS shield over the serial port UART0. However, in Raspbian this port is usually used as serial console, which is why we cannot directly access the GPS shield. To turn this feature off and activate the module, you have to follow these steps:

  1. Edit the file /boot/cmdline.txt and delete all parameters containing the key ttyAMA0:
    console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200

    Afterwards, our file contains this text:

    dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline rootwait
    
  2. Edit the file /etc/inittab and comment the following line out:
    T0:23:respawn:/sbin/getty -L ttyAMA0 115200 vt100

    Comments are identified by the hash sign; the result should look as follows:

    #T0:23:respawn:/sbin/getty -L ttyAMA0 115200 vt100
    
  3. Next, we have to reboot the Raspberry Pi:
    sudo reboot
    
  4. Finally, we can test the GPS module with Minicom. The baud rate is 9600 and the device name is /dev/ttyAMA0:
    sudo minicom -b 9600 -D /dev/ttyAMA0 -o
    

    If necessary, you can install Minicom using APT:

    sudo apt-get install minicom
    
    

    You can quit Minicom with the key combination strg+a followed by z.

If you succeed, Minicom will continually output a stream of GPS data. Depending on wether the GPS module attains a lock, that is, wether it receives GPS data by a satellite, the output changes. While no data is received, the output remains mostly empty.

$GPGGA,080327.199,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*59
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPRMC,080327.199,V,,,,,,,240314,,,N*42
$GPGGA,080328.199,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*56
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPRMC,080328.199,V,,,,,,,240314,,,N*4D
$GPGGA,080329.199,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*57
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPGSV,3,1,12,02,14,214,29,04,64,182,24,05,00,000,21,10,00,000,23*7E
$GPGSV,3,2,12,12,03,334,26,08,57,094,,23,52,187,,27,52,110,*76
$GPGSV,3,3,12,03,36,332,,09,32,128,,24,27,212,,17,26,350,*7B

Once the GPS module starts receiving a signal, Minicom will display more data as in the example below. If you encounter problems in attaining a GPS lock, it might help to place the Raspberry Pi outside.

$GPGSA,A,3,17,09,28,08,26,07,15,,,,,,2.4,1.4,1.9*.6,1.7,2.0*3C
$GPRMC,031349.000,A,3355.3471,N,11751.7128,W,0.00,143.39,210314,,,A*76
$GPGGA,031350.000,3355.3471,N,11751.7128,W,1,06,1.7,112.2,M,-33.7,M,,0000*6F
$GPGSA,A,3,17,09,28,08,07,15,,,,,,,2.6,1.7,2.0*3C
$GPGSV,3,1,12,17,67,201,30,09,62,112,28,28,57,022,21,08,55,104,20*7E
$GPGSV,3,2,12,07,25,124,22,15,24,302,30,11,17,052,26,26,49,262,05*73
$GPGSV,3,3,12,30,51,112,31,57,31,122,,01,24,073,,04,05,176,*7E
$GPRMC,031350.000,A,3355.3471,N,11741.7128,W,0.00,143.39,210314,,,A*7E
$GPGGA,031351.000,3355.3471,N,11741.7128,W,1,07,1.4,112.2,M,-33.7,M,,0000*6C

A detailed description of the GPS format emitted by the Sparqee GPSv1.0 can be found here. Probably the most important information, the GPS coordinates, is contained by the line starting with $GPGGA: In this case, the module was located at 33° 55.3471′ Latitude North and 117° 41.7128′ Longitude West at an altitude of 112.2 meters above mean sea level.

Conclusion

We demonstrated how to connect a Sparqee GPS shield to a Raspberry Pi and how to display the GPS data via Minicom. In the next part, we will write a network service that extracts and delivers the GPS data from the serial port.

About PrintStream and Exceptions

Several of our projects deal with sensor hardware of different types often connected via the good old™ serial port. That is fine most of the time because most protocols are simple and RXTX provides a nice cross-platform library for most of your serial port needs. But many new computers do not feature the old RS232 serial ports anymore or other contraints prevent the use of a plain RS232 serial port. Here come serial converters like the Advantech ADAM 4570 (serial-to ethernet) or usb-to-serial converters into play. Usually this works fine.

Now one of our customers had a test system using an unreliable converter with sensor hardware. The hardware problems uncovered a robustness issue in our software which crashed the JVM when the virtual serial port of the converter disappeared and our app tried to write to it. Despite the faulty hardware our software had to be robust because it manages many more devices other than just that one sensor over serial. Looking at the problem we discovered that the crash occurred somewhere in the native part of RXTX. So we decided to scratch our own itch (and the one of the customer) and set out to fix the issue in RXTX at a Open Source Love Day (OSLD) . So we fixed the problem and submitted the patch to the bugtracker of the RXTX project. Our sample program now worked flawlessly and threw an IOException when the serial port failed in some way.

Happy to have fixed the problem we incorporated the patch RXTX in our production software but it still crashed and no IOException appeared anywhere in the logs. After another bughunting session we spotted the subtle difference of sample and production program: the use of OutputStream insted of PrintStream. PrintStream silently swallows all exceptions which proved fatal in our use case with the unreliable stream carrier. So the final fix was essentially replacing our PrintStream code

RXTXPort port = new RXTXPort("COM6");
PrintStream p = new PrintStream(port.getOutputStream(), true, "iso8859");
p.print("command");

with using OutputStream directly:

RXTXPort port = new RXTXPort("COM6");
OutputStream o = port.getOutputStream();
o.write("command".getBytes("iso8859"));

Conclusion

Be careful when using PrintStream with unreliable stream carriers it swallows exceptions! That may shadow problems which you may want to know of. Often PrintStreams behaviour will not be a problem but in certain cases like the one depicted above it causes a lot of headaches.