Your most precious resource

When I was a young student, living on my own for the first time, my most scarce resource seemed to be money. Money’s too tight to mention was (and probably still is) a motto that every student could understand. So we traded our time for money and participated in experiments and underpaid student assistant jobs.

Soon after I graduated, money began to accumulate. I have a rather frugal lifestyle, so my expenses didn’t suddenly surge. Instead, my perception of time and money shifted: Money isn’t the bottleneck (anymore), time is. Suddenly, time was much more valueable than money and I would gladly pay money if that meant some hours of additional leisure time or one less problem to tend to. It seems that time is the most precious thing there is.

The traditional economic wisdom supports this idea: “Time is money” is true, but the reverse is not: “money is time” doesn’t cut it. The richest man on earth still only has as much time available to him as anybody else.

If time is the most precious resource, the drive to automation as a time-saving effort can be understood directly. Automation also reduces learning costs if you scale horizontally by parallelizing production.

But soon after I had enough money to optimize my time, I hit another resource bottleneck. Suddenly, I had more time on hand than attention to spare. It turns out that attention is the most valueable resource you can spend. It is just entangled enough with time that its hard to distinguish which runs out first. If you reflect a bit, it becomes obvious. The term “to pay attention” is pretty spot on.

Let me take up the thought of automation again, this time in the domain of software development, in the form of automated tests. Here, automation is not in its most profitable shape. You don’t gain much from scaling your tests horizontally. If you don’t change the code, it doesn’t matter if your tests run once or a thousand times in parallel, the result will be the same (except if you run hardware-dependent tests, but even then you probably don’t gain much after covering all hardware variations).

You also don’t gain much from scaling your tests vertically by making them run faster and faster. It sure helps to have them run continuously in the background (think of a user-modded compiler – look into Continuous Test Runners if you are interested), but after one test run per meaningful change, the profit hits a limit.

So why else is automated testing an economically sound practice? My take on it is delegated attention. You write a small software (your test) that augments your attention area onto code that probably fades from your own attention pretty soon. Automated tests provide automated attention in a sustainable manner (except for those tests that cry wolf for no good reason, those are attention sinks and should be removed from your portfolio). Because of the automation, this delegated attention never fades – even after many years, the test has a close eye on “its” code.

If you are a developer, you have automation and zero-cost copying (aka parallelization without upfront costs) intrinsically in your solution portfolio. Look for ways how to make money with those super-powers. Or even better, look for ways to save time. But if you want the best return on investment for your efforts, you should look for ways to expand your attention area.

Do you agree that attention is our most precious resource? What do you do to lower your attention expenses? Perhaps you have experience in the Ops/DevOps area that resonates with this thoughts? Share your opinion by commenting below or writing your own blog entry!

We will pay attention to you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.