The inevitable emergence of domain events

Even if you’ve read the original Domain Driven Design book by Eric Evans, you’ve probably still not heard about domain events (or DDD Domain Events), as he didn’t include them in the book. He talked about it a lot since then, for example in this talk in 2009 in the first 30 minutes.

Domain Events

In short, domain events are occurrences of “something that domain experts care about”. You should always be on the lookout for these events, because they are integral parts of the interface between the technical world and the domain world. In your source code, both worlds condense as the same things, so it isn’t easy (or downright impossible) to tell them apart. But if you are familiar with the concept of “pure fabrication”, you probably know that a single line of code can clearly belong to the technical fabric and still be relevant for the domain. Domain events are one possibility to separate the belongings again. But you have to listen to your domain experts, and they probably still don’t tell you the full story about what they care about.

Revealed by Refactoring

To underline my point, I want to tell you a story about a software project in a big organization. The software is already in production when my consulting job brings me into contact with the source code. We talked about a specific part of the code that screamed “pure fabrication” with just a few lines of domain code in between. Our goal was to refactor the code into two parts, one for the domain code and the other, bigger one for the technical part. In the technical part, some texts get logged into the logfile, like “item successfully written to the database” and “database connection closed”. It were clearly technical aspects of the code that got logged.

One of the texts had a spelling error in it and I reached out to correct it. A developer stopped me: “Don’t do that! They filter for that exact phrase.”. That surprised me. Nothing in the code indicated the relevance of that log statement, least of all the necessity of that typo. And I didn’t know who “they” were and that the logfiles got searched. So I asked a lot of questions and finally understood the situation:

Implicit Domain Events

The developers implemented the requirements of the domain experts as given in the specification documents. Nothing in there specified the exact text or even presence of logfile entries. But after the software was done and in production, the business side (including the domain experts) needed to know how many items were added to the system in a given period. And because they needed the information right away and couldn’t wait for the next development cycle, they contacted the operation department (that is separated from the development department) and got copies of the logfiles. They scanned the logfiles with some crude regular expression magic for the entries (like “item written to the database”) and got their result. The question was answered, the problem solved and the solution even worked a second time – and a third time, and so on. The one-time makeshift script was used permanently and repeatedly, in fact, it ran every hour and scanned for new items, because it became apparent that the business not only needed the statistics, but wanted to start a business process for each new item (like an editorial review of sorts) in a timely manner.

Pinned Code

Over the course of a few weeks, the purely technical logfile entry line in the source code got pinned and converted to a crucial domain requirement without any formal specification or even notification. Nothing in the source code hinted at the importance of this line or its typo. No test, no comment, no code structure. The line looked exactly the same as before, but suddenly played in another league. Every modification at this place or its surrounding code could hamper the business. Performing a well-intended refactoring could be seen as direct sabotage. The code was sacred, but in the unspoken kind. The code became a minefield.

Extracting the Domain Event

The whole hostage situation could be resolved by revealing the domain event and making it explicit. Let’s say that we model an “item added” domain event and post it in addition to the logfile entry. How we post it is up to the requirement or capabilities of the business department. An HTTP request to another service for every new item is a simple and viable solution. A line of text in a dedicated event log file would be another option. Even an e-mail sent to an human recipient could be discussed. Anything that separates the technical logfile from the business view on the system is better than forbidden code. After the separation, we can refactor the technical parts to our liking and still have tests in place that ensure that the domain event gets posted.

Domain Events are important

These domain events are important parts of your system, because they represent things (or actions) that the business cares about. Even if the business only remembers them after the fact, try to incorporate them in an explicit manner into your code. Not only will you be able to tell domain code and technical code apart easily, but you’ll also get this precious interface between business and tech. Make a list of all your domain events and you’ll know how your system is seen in the domain expert world. Everything else is more or less just details.

What story about implicit domain events comes to your mind? Tell us in a comment or write a blog entry about it. We want to hear from you!

How to approach big tasks

In the heart of software development lies “the system”. The system is always complicated enough that you cannot fully grasp it and it is built by stacking parts on top of another that are just a tad too big to be called simple. The life of a software developer is an ongoing series of isolated projects that are at the threshold of his or her capabilities. We call these projects “epics”, “stories” or just “issues”. The sum of these projects is a system.

Don’t get me wrong – there a tons of issues that just require an hour, a cup of coffee and a few lines of code. This is the green zone of software development. You cannot possibly fail these issues. If you require twice the time, it’s still way before lunchtime. And even if you fail them, a colleague will have your back.
I’m talking about those issues that appear on your to-do list and behave like roadblocks. You dread them from far away and you know that this isn’t smooth sailing for an hour, this will be tough work for several days. This isn’t just an issue, it is an issue by itself for you. You are definitely unsure if you can make it.

Typical small project management

How do you approach such a project? It isn’t an issue anymore, as soon as you get emotionally involved, it becomes a project. Even if your emotion is just dread or fear, it is still involvement. Even if your management style is evasion, it is still project management. Sure, you can reassign a few of these icebergs, but they will always be there. You need to learn to navigate and to tackle them. Hitting an iceberg in the “frontal collision”-style isn’t a good idea.

On closer inspection, every project consists of numerous parts that you already know a solution for – typical one-hour issues – and just a few parts that you cannot estimate because you don’t know how to even start. Many developers in this situation take the route of least resistance and start with the known pieces. It’s obvious, it feels good (you are making good progress, after all!) and it defers failure into an uncertain future (aka next work week). Right now, the project is under control and on its way. We can report 80% finished because we’ve done all the known parts. How hard can the unknown parts be anyway? Until they strike hard and wreck your estimates with “unforeseen challenges” and “sudden hardships”. At least this is what you tell your manager.

Risk first!

My preferred way to approach those projects is to reveal the whole map, to estimate all parts before I delve into the details. I already know most of the easy parts, but what about the unknown and/or hard parts? I don’t know their solution so I cannot reliably estimate their size. So I sit down and try to extract the core problem that I don’t know how to solve yet. This is the thing that prohibits an estimate. This is the white area on my map. This is the “here be dragons” area. If I spend my resources doing all the work other than this, I will succeed until I stand on the border of this area and see the dragon. And I will not have sufficient resources left. My allies (like my manager and colleagues) will grow weary. I will have to fight my hardest battle in the most inconvenient setting.

My approach is to take the risk upfront. Tackle the core problem and fail. Get up and tackle it again. Fail once more. And again. If you succeed with your task, the war is won. Your project will still require work, but it’s the easy kind of work (“just work”). You can estimate the remaining tasks and even if you’ve overspent in your first battle, you reliably know how much more resources you will need.

Fail fast

And if you don’t succeed? Well, then you know it with the least damage done. Your project will enter crisis mode, but in a position when there is still time and resources left. This is the concept of “fail fast”. To be able to fail fast, you need choose the “risk first” approach of task selection. To tackle the risk first, you need to be able to quantify the “risk” of your upcoming work.

Assessing risk

There are whole books about risk assessment that are interesting and helpful, but as a starter, you only need to listen to your stomach. If your stomach tells you that you are unsure about a specific part of your project, put that part on the “risky” list. If you don’t have a reliable stomach, try to estimate the part’s size. Do the estimation game with your colleagues. Planning poker, for example, is a great tool to uncover uncertainty because the estimates will differ. Just remember: Risk isn’t correlated with size. Just because a part is big doesn’t mean it is risky, too. Your crucial part can maybe be developed in an hour or two, given an inspiration and a cup of coffee.

Failing late means you’re out of options. Failing fast means you’ve eliminated an option and moved on.

Developer Experience means nothing

You’ve probably already heard about the concept of User Experience (UX) and the matching virtue of User Experience Design. If not, you might want to go check it out. I would suggest you start with the excellent book “The Design of Everyday Things” from Donald Norman. It has nothing to do with software development, so you won’t mix up User Experience Design with Graphical User Interface Design or even Graphics Design.

In short, User Experience is what an user of your software will experience while using your software. If your software makes them smile, you’re some kind of UX god. If your software makes them curse repeatedly, you’re probably not. You can try to improve the experiences of your users by making changes to the software. This is called User Experience Design and is an important part of software development. Most developers know nothing about User Experience Design.

What developers naturally know about is Developer Experience (DX), a concept that isn’t really defined in the literature. I made it up to explain my point to you. Every software developer has a favorite programming language and IDE. Remember, the source codes of the same problem in different programming languages will ultimately yield the same machine code. The machine is totally agnostic about your preferences for a certain programming language. Your choice of a programming language for a certain problem is more about your Developer Experience than anything else. Developer Experience is everything you feel and think during software development. A bad Developer Experience lets you swear about the tools, the code and everything and everybody else around you. A good Developer Experience gives you a sense of accomplishment and safety while coding and makes your work not harder than necessary.

Because you can’t read elsewhere about the concept of Developer Experience, I want to give two more examples and show how it affects the User Experience. The first example is a big, long-lasting software system that is in production and still developed further. If you have a software system in production, everything requires an additional thought about the matching upgrade strategy. You can’t just modify the database structure, you need to provide migrations. You can’t just add a configuration entry, you need to make it optional or consider the least harmful default value. In the project of our example, the developers had three possible approaches to a new configuration entry:

  • They could add it to the code but leave the configuration files unchanged. This required the code to handle the “absent from configuration” case in a useful manner. It required the developer to make effort in the code. The user would not know about the new configuration entry if not stated in some external documentation.
  • They could add it to the code and write a configuration migration script that added it to the existing configuration files on the customer’s installation. The code could now expect the entry to be present, but the developer had to write and test the migration script code. The user would see the new configuration entry with the default value.
  • They could introduce a new configuration file to the system and place the new configuration entry in it. The code could expect the entry to be present, because new configuration files were added to an existing installation during the upgrade process. The user would see the new configuration file and the new configuration entry with the default value.

You can probably guess which of the three options got used so excessively that users complained about the configuration being all over the place, in a myriad of little one-liner configuration files with ominous names. The developers chose the best option for them and, in short view, for the users. But on the long run, the User Experience declined.

The second example is from a computer game in the mid 2000s. It was a massive multiplayer online shooter with a decent implementation ahead of its time. But one thing was still from the last century: After each update of the game, the key bindings were reset to the default. And every other aspect of local modification to the settings, too. After each update, you had to configure your video, audio, controls and everything else like your in-game equipment again and again. The game didn’t offer any means to copy or reload your settings. It was up to you to maintain a recent backup of the settings files just in case. And if the file format was changed, you needed to combine their changes with yours. WinMerge is a decent tool for that task. But the problem is clear: The game developers couldn’t be bothered to think about how their upgrade strategy would affect their users. They ignored the problem and let the users figure it out. They chose better Developer Experience, free from complexities like user-side modifications over good User Experience like a game that can be upgraded without drawbacks for the gamers.

Sadly, this is an usual formula in software development: Developer Experience is more important than User Experience. Just look at it from an utilitarian point of view: If you burden thousands or even millions of users with just an easy one-minute task that you could fix during development, you have a budget of two workdays up to 10 person-years. Do the math yourself: One million users, each spending one minute of work on your software, equal to over 2000 workdays lost on a thing you could probably fix for everybody in an hour or two.

And this brings me to my central statement: Developer Experience, as opposed to User Experience, means nothing. It’s just not important. At least for all the users. It is important to the small group of developers and should not be forgotten. But never should a decision lead to better Developer Experience on the expense of User Experience. It’s a small inconvenience for us developers to think about smooth upgrades, meaningful and consistent control element titles or an easy installation. It’s a whole new game for our users.

Always choose User Experience over Developer Experience.

Call to action: If you have another good example of developers being lazy on the expense of their users, please share it as a comment.

Call to action 2: The initial picture is linked from the excellent website badhtml.com. If you ever feel like an imposter for your latest design, go and visit this website.

The Pure Fabrication Tax

Last week, I attended the Maexle event of the C++ user group in Karlsruhe. The Maexle event is basically a programming contest where your program plays the Mia dice game against other programs. You have to implement a simple network protocol to join games, announce rolls and call bluffs. Your program earns points for every game it has participated and not lost. So there is a strong emphasis on starting early and staying in the game, even if your program doesn’t perform the best.

Since it was an event of the C++ user group, the programming language to be used was C++. I’m certainly no C++ hero and knew I couldn’t compete, so I joined the fun with an espionage role and programmed an observing bot that doesn’t play, but gathers data on the players. I chose Java for the task. My observer was online after two minutes, the first real player joined the server after 20 minutes. It turned out to be written in Python. The first real C++ bot was online after 35 minutes, the last one played its first round after two hours.

I listened closely to the problems the teams around me tackled and noticed something strange: Nobody talked about the actual game (Maexle/Mia). Every task was a technical one. Let’s talk about why that’s a problem.

Three Definitions

Before I dive into the subject, I want to define some terms that I’ll use to help you understand my point. It’s entirely possible to look at the story above and see a bunch of engineers having fun with some engineering tasks.

  • First, I value the economics of my customer. In this case, the customer is a lonely server on the LAN that wants to host some games of Maexle for bots. Like, lots of games. Thousands of games. The customer gives points for early market entry, so time to market is an economic factor (or a key performance indicator, some might say). You can roughly say that being online early means you can make bucks longer. The second key performance indicator is uptime. You want to stay in the game as long as you don’t lose all the time. There are some more KPI, but the two I’ve listed should have a major impact in your programming approach – if you value the economics.
  • Second, I don’t care about tools. A programming language is a tool. A compiler is a tool. Your IDE or text editor is a tool. Use your preferred tooling as long as it suits your needs. That means explicitely as long as it doesn’t actively work against your other values like the customer’s economics. This blog post is definitely not about Java or Python being “better” or “better suited” than C++. They aren’t. The first two bots (observer and player) were programmed by participants that had prior experience with the event. It wasn’t the tool that made them fast, it was the absence of rookie errors in the domain and its technical structure.
  • Third, I will explain my point with the concept of “pure fabrication. Pure fabrication is everything that is not specified by the customer, but necessary to fulfill the specification. It’s the code you write because your customer wants to persist some data. He never ordered you to write SQL statements or “open a connection to the database”, maybe he didn’t even know what a database was. Your customer wanted the data stored somehow. The code that enables you to actually program the storage is “pure fabrication” in terms of the domain. Think of it as a scaffolding holding your domain code in place. If you hire a painter to color your house, he will scaffold the walls to reach every spot with ease. You didn’t hire him to set those structures up, they are just necessary for the task. The difference to most of our code is that the painter removes the scaffolding afterwards.

Pure Fabrication vs. Domain

So, if I would have been a customer on the Maexle event, paying for a competitive Maexle bot, I would be very surprised about the actual construction process. Up to two hours into a three-hours event, my programmer would solve apparently hard and important problems, but not my problems. In fact, I wouldn’t even understand the relation between the attempted problems and my required solution. And I would have to have blind faith for more than half my money that something useable will come out of this.

This is the effect of too much pure fabrication in the programming approach. I’m all for solving hard programming problems, but I’m not interested in solving them over and over again. After some iterations, they become solved problems or, essentially, tools. And I don’t care about tools as long as they get their job done. If your domain problem requires a better tool, then we can put the programming problem on our todo list again. Otherwise, we are not valueing our customer’s economics, we are showing off to our peers.

If you program a simple game of Maexle with a heavy emphasis on time to market and even after the initial ramp up aren’t able to reason about your code using language from the domain (like game, dice, roll, bluff, double and, of course, mia), you are staying in pure fabrication land. That’s the level of programming where it matters if you used an integer or freed that memory. That’s when you pay the Pure Fabrication Tax to the fullest. Because your code now does something valueable in the domain, but the distance between your customer’s language and your code’s language is an hindrance. And this distance will demand its tax with every new feature, every change request and every bug.

Bugs are another area where the distance is measureable. If you can’t explain your bugs to the customer, you’ve made them in the pure fabrication part of your code. If you can never explain your bugs, your domain code is hidden between lines and lines of source code with lots of special characters, brackets and magic numbers. Just imagine your hired painter tries to tell you why your house is now pink instead of white or yellow: “It was a small mishap in the way we constructed the scaffolding, we used an E5 steel beam instead of a rail clamp and forgot to perform a hammer check on it”. The last part is totally made up, but I’m sure that’s how we sound for non-programmers.

Exemptions from the Tax?

What solution would I suggest? I don’t think there is a definite solution to the problem. You can’t go full Domain Driven Design on a three-hour Maexle event. By the time you’ve built your fancy Domain Specific Language to write code with the customer besides you, everybody else has gathered their game points and gone home. If you switch to a language that has a string tokenizer in its standard library, you can speed up your programming, but maybe just produce a bigger heap of slightly less low-leveled pure fabrication code.

I don’t want to advocate a solution. My attempt is to highlight the problem: The Pure Fabrication Tax. Given the right (or wrong) amount of extrinsic (or intrinsic) motivation, we are able to produce a mess in just a few hours without really connecting to the domain we produce the mess for. If we didn’t program a Maexle bot that night, but a poker bot or a chat bot, most if not all of the problems and bugs would have been the same. This is not a domain-specific problem. It’s our problem. We probably just like to pay the tax.

What are your thoughts on the Pure Fabrication Tax? Can you see it? Do you have an idea for a solution approach? Leave your comment below!

Disclaimer

And to counter everybody who thinks I’m just bashing the other participants on the event: I was the first one online on the server, with a task that requires virtually no effort and doesn’t even participate directly in the competition, with tools that solved nearly all my pure fabrication problems and still managed to create a program that contained less than five domain terms and was useless for its intended purpose. I said I value the economics of my customer (even if there was none), so I know that I failed hardest on the event. And I had prior knowledge. There was just nobody to compare my mess to.

Transforming C-Style arrays in java

Every now and then some customer asks us to fix or improve some important legacy application other people have written. Usually, such projects are fun and it is rewarding to see the improvements both in code and value for the users.

In one of these projects there is a Java GUI application that uses C-style arrays for some of its central data structures:

public class LegoBox  {
  public LegoBrick[] bricks = new LegoBrick[8000];
  public int brickCount = 0;
}

The array-length is a constant upper bound and does not denote the actual elements in the array. Elements are added dynamically to the array and it looks like a typical job for a automatically growing Collection like java.util.ArrayList. Most operations simply iterate over all elements and perform some calculations. But changing such a central part in a performance sensitive application is not only a lot of work but also risky.

We decided to take an incremental approach to improve code readability and maintainability and measured performance with a large, representative dataset between refactorings. There are two easy alternative APIs that improve working with the above data structure.

Imperative API

Smooth migration from the existing imperative “ask”-code (see “Tell, don’t ask”-principle) can be realized by providing an java.util.Iterable to the underlying array.


public int countRedBricks() {
  int redBrickCount = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < box.brickCount; i++) {
    if (box.bricks[i].isRed()) {
      redBrickCount++;
    }
  }
  return redBrickCount;
}

Code like above is easily transformed to much clearer code like below:

public class LegoBox  {
  public LegoBrick[] bricks = new LegoBrick[8000];
  public int brickCount = 0;

  public Iterable<LegoBrick> allBricks() {
    return Arrays.stream(tr, 0, brickCount).collect(Collectors.toList());
  }
}

public int countRedBricks() {
  int redBrickCount = 0;
  for (LegoBrick brick : box.bricks) {
    if (brick.isRed()) {
      redBrickCount++;
    }
  }
  return redBrickCount;
}

Functional API

A nice alternative to the imperative solution above is a functional interface to the array. In Java 8 and newer we can provide that easily and encapsulate the iteration over our array:

public class LegoBox  {
  public LegoBrick[] bricks = new LegoBrick[8000];
  public int brickCount = 0;

  public <R> R forAllBricks(Function<Brick, R> operation, R identity, BinaryOperator<R> reducer) {
    return Arrays.stream(bricks, 0, brickCount).map(operation).reduce(identity, reducer);
  }

  public void forAllBricks(Consumer<LegoBrick> operation) {
    Arrays.stream(bricks, 0, brickCount).forEach(operation);
  }
}

public int countRedBricks() {
  return box.forAllBricks(brick -> brick.isRed() ? 1 : 0, 0, (sum, current) -> sum + current);
}

The functional methods can be tailored to your specific needs, of course. I just provided two examples for possible functional interfaces and their implementation.

The function + reducer case is a very general interface and used here for an implementation of our “count the red bricks” use case. Alternatively you could implement this use case with a more specific but easier to use filter + count interface:

public class LegoBox  {
  public LegoBrick[] bricks = new LegoBrick[8000];
  public int brickCount = 0;

  public long countBricks(Predicate<Brick> filter) {
    return Arrays.stream(bricks, 0, brickCount).filter(operation).count();
  }
}

public int countRedBricks() {
  return box.countBricks(brick -> brick.isRed());
}

The consumer case is very simple and found a lot in this specific project because mutation of the array elements is a typical operation and all over the place.

The functional API avoids duplicating the iteration all the time and removes the need to access the array or iterable/collection. It is therefore much more in the spirit of “tell”.

Conclusion

The new interfaces allow for much simpler and maintainable client code and remove a lot of duplicated iterations on the client side. They can be introduced on the way when implementing requested features for the customer.

That way we invested only minimal effort in cleaner, better maintainable and more error-proof code. When someday all accesses to the public array are encapsulated we can use the new found freedom to internalize the array and change it to a better fitting data structure like an ArrayList.

Implementation visibility – Part III

In the first article of this series, I presented the concept of “implementation visibility”. Every requirement can be expressed in source code on a scale of how prominent the implementation will be. There are at least five stages (or levels) on the scale:

  • level 0: Inline
    • level 0+: Inline with comment
    • level 0++: Inline with apologetic comment
  • level 1: separate method
  • level 2: separate class
    • level 2+: new type in domain model
  • level 3: separate aggregate
  • level 4: separate package or module
  • level 5: separate application or service

We examined a simple code example in both preceding articles. The level 0, 0+ and 0++ were covered in the first article, while the second article talked about level 1, 2 and 2+. You might want to read them first if you want to follow the progression through the ranks. In this article, we look at the example at level 3, have a short outlook on further levels and then recap the concept.

A quick reminder

Our example is a webshop that lacks brutto prices. The original code of our shopping cart renderer might looked like this:


public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable&amp;amp;lt;Product&amp;amp;gt; inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice());
    }
    return result;
  }
}

Visibility level 3: Domain drive all the things!

We’ve introduced a new class for our requirement in visibility level 2 and made it a domain type. This is mostly another name for the concept of Entities or Value Objects from Domain Driven Design (DDD). If you aren’t familiar with Domain Driven Design, I recommend you grab the original book or its worthy successor and read about it. It is a way to look at requirements and code that will transform the way you develop software. To give a short spoiler, DDD Entities and DDD Value Objects are named core domain concepts that form the foundation of every DDD application. They are found by learning about the problem domain your software is used in. DDD Entities have an own identity, while DDD Value Objects just exist to indicate a certain value. Every DDD Entity and most DDD Value Objects are part of an DDD Aggregate. To load and store DDD Aggregates, a DDD Repository is put into place. The DDD Repository encapsulates all the technical stuff that has to happen when the application wants to access an DDD Aggregate through its DDD Root Entity. Sorry for all the “DDD” prefixes, but the terms are overloaded with many different meanings in our profession and I want to be clear what I mean when I use the terms “Repository” or “Aggregate”. Be very careful not to mistake the DDD meanings of the terms for any other meaning out there. Please read the books if you are unsure.

So, in Domain Driven Design, our BruttoPrice type is really a DDD Value Object. It represents a certain value in our currency of choice (Euro in our example), but has no life cycle on its own. Two BruttoPrices can be considered “the same” if their values are equal. This raises the question what the DDD Root Entity of the corresponding DDD Aggregate might be. Just imagine what happens in the domain (in real life, on paper) if you calculate a brutto price from a given netto price: You determine the value added tax category of your taxable product, look up its current percentage and multiply your netto price with the percentage. The DDD Root Entity is the value added tax category, as it can be introduced and revoked by your government and therefor has a life cycle on its own. The tax percentage, the netto price and the brutto price are just DDD Value Objects in its vicinity.

To bring DDD into our code and raise the implementation visibility level, we need to introduce a lot of new types with lots of lines of code:

  • NettoPrice is a DDD Value Object representing the concept of a monetary value without taxes.
  • BruttoPrice is a DDD Value Object representing the concept of a monetary value including taxes.
  • ValueAddedTaxCategory is a DDD Root Entity standing for the concept of different VAT percentages for different product groups.
  • ValueAddedTaxPercentage might be a DDD Value Object representing the concept of a percentage being applied to a NettoPrice to get a BruttoPrice. We will omit this explicit concept and let the ValueAddedTaxCategory deal with the calculation internally.
  • ValueAddedTaxRepository is a DDD Repository providing the ability to retrieve a ValueAddedTaxCategory for a known Taxable.
  • Taxable might be a DDD Entity. For us, it will remain an abstraction to decouple our taxes from other concrete types like Product.

The most surprising new class is probably the ValueAddedTaxRepository. It lingered in our code in nearly all previous levels, but wasn’t prominent, not visible enough to be explicit. Remember lines like this?

final BigDecimal taxFactor = <gets the right tax factor from somewhere> 

Now we know where to retrieve our ValueAddedTaxCategory from! And we don’t even know that the VAT is calculated using a percentage or factor anymore. That’s a detail of the ValueAddedTaxCategory given to us from the ValueAddedTaxRepository. If one day, for example at April 1th, 2020, the VAT for bottled water is decreed to be a fixed amount per bottle, we might need to change the internals of our VAT DDD Aggregate, but the netto and brutto prices and the rest of the application won’t even notice.

We’ve given our different reasons of change different places in our code. We have separated our concerns. This separation requires a lot of work to be spelled out. Let’s look at the code of our example at implementation visibility level 3:

public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable<Product> inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    final ValueAddedTaxRepository vatProvider = givenVatRepository();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      final ValueAddedTaxCategory vat = vatProvider.forType(each);
      final BruttoPrice bruttoPrice = vat.applyTo(each.nettoPrice());
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice(),
            bruttoPrice);
    }
    return result;
  }
}

There are now three lines of code responsible for calculating the brutto prices. It gets ridiculous! First we obtain the DDD Repository from somewhere. Somebody probably gave us the reference in the constructor or something. Just to remind you: The class is named ShowShoppingCart and now needs to know about a class that calls itself ValueAddedTaxRepository. Then, we obtain the corresponding ValueAddedTaxCategory for each Product or Taxable in our shopping cart. We apply this VAT to the NettoPrice of the Product/Taxable and pass the resulting BruttoPrice side by side with the NettoPrice in the addProductLine() method. Notice how we changed the signature of the method to differentiate between NettoPrice and BruttoPrice instead of using just to Euro parameters. Those domain types are now our level of abstraction. We don’t really care about Euro anymore. The prices might be expressed in mussle shells or bottle caps and we still could use our code without modification.

The ValueAddedTaxCategory we obtain from the DDD Repository isn’t a class with a concrete implementation. Instead, it is an interface:


/**
* AN-17: Calculates the brutto price (netto price with value added tax (VAT))
* for the given netto price.
*/
public interface ValueAddedTaxCategory {
  public BruttoPrice applyTo(NettoPrice nettoPrice);
}

Now we could nearly get rid of the comment above. It just repeats what the signature of the single method in this type says, too. We keep it for the reference to the requirement (AN-17).

Right now, the interface has only one implementation in the class PercentageValueAddedTaxCategory:


public class PercentageValueAddedTaxCategory implements ValueAddedTaxCategory {
  private final BigDecimal percentage;

  public PercentageValueAddedTaxCategory(final BigDecimal percentage) {
    this.percentage = percentage;
  }

  @Override
  public BruttoPrice applyTo(NettoPrice nettoPrice) {
    final Euro value = nettoPrice.multiplyWith(this.percentage).inEuro();
    return new BruttoPrice(value);
  }
}

You might notice that the concrete code of applyTo still has knowledge about the Euro. As long as we don’t ingrain the relationship between NettoPrice and BruttoPrice in these types, somebody has to do the conversion externally – and needs to know about implementation details of these types. That’s an observation that you should at least note down in your domain crunching documents. It isn’t necessarily bad code, but a spot that will require modification once the currency changes to cola bottle caps.

This is a good moment to reconsider what we’ve done to our ShowShoppingCart class. Let’s refactor the code a bit and move the responsibility for value added taxes where it belongs: in the Product type.


public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable<Product> inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice(),
            each.bruttoPrice());
    }
    return result;
  }

}

Now we have made a full circle: Our code looks like it began without the brutto prices, but with one additional line that delivers the brutto prices to the product line in the ShoppingCartRenderModel. The whole infrastructure that we’ve built is hidden behind the Product/Taxable type interface. We still use all of the domain types from above, we’ve just changed the location where we use them. The whole concept complex of different price types, value added taxes and tax categories is a top level construct in our application now. It shows up in the domain model and in the vocabulatory of our project. It isn’t a quick fix, it’s the introduction of a whole set of new ideas and our code now reflects that.

The code at implementation visibility level 3 might seem bloated and over-engineered to some. There is probably truth in this judgement. We’ve introduced far more code seams in the form of abstractions and indirections than we can utilize in the moment. We’ve prepared for an uncertain future. That might turn out to be unnecessary and would then be waste.

So let’s look at our journey as an example of what could be done. There is no need to walk all the way all the time. But you should be able to walk it in case it proves necessary.

Visibility level 4 and above: To infinity and beyond!

Remember that there are implementation visibility levels above 3! If you choose such a level, there will be even more code, more classes and types, more indirection and more abstraction. Suddenly, your new code will show up on system architecture diagrams and be deployed independently. Maybe you’ll need a dedicated server for it or scale it all the way up to its own server farm. Our example doesn’t match those criterias, so I stop here and just say that visibility level 3 isn’t the end of the journey. But you probably got the idea and can continue on your own now.

Recap: Rising through the visibility levels

We’ve come a long way since level 0 in terms of implementation visibility. The code still does the same thing, it just accumulates structure (some may call it cruft) and fletches out the relationships between concepts. In doing so, different axis of change emerge in different locations instead of entangled in one place. Our development effort rises, but we hope for a return on investment in the future.

I’ve found it easier to elevate the implementation visibility level of some code later than to decrease it. You might experience it the other way around. In the end, it doesn’t matter which way we choose – we have to match the importance of the requirement in the code. And as the requirements and their importance change, our code has to adjust to it in order to stay relevant. It isn’t the visibility level you choose now that will decide if your code is visible enough, it is the necessary visibility level you cannot reach for one reason or the other that will doom your code. Because it “feels bloated” and gets replaced, because it wasn’t found in time and is duplicated somewhere else, because it fused together with unrelated code and cannot be separated. Because of a plethora of reasons. By choosing and changing the implementation visibility level of your code deliberately, you at least take the responsibility to minimize the effects of those reasons. And that will empower you even if not all your decisions turn out profitable.

Conclusion

With the end of this third part, our series about the concept of implementation visibility comes to an end. I hope you’ve enjoyed the journey and gained some insights. If you happen to identify an example where this concept could help you, I’d love to hear from you! And if you know about a book or some other source where this concept is explained, too – please comment with a link below.

Implementation visibility – Part II

In the first article of this series, I presented the concept of “implementation visibility”. Every requirement can be expressed in source code on a scale of how prominent the implementation will be. There are at least five stages (or levels) on the scale:

  • level 0: Inline
    • level 0+: Inline with comment
    • level 0++: Inline with apologetic comment
  • level 1: separate method
  • level 2: separate class
    • level 2+: new type in domain model
  • level 3: separate aggregate
  • level 4: separate package or module
  • level 5: separate application or service

The article then introduced a simple example and examined how the level 0, 0+ and 0++ would appear within the example code. You may want to read the first article before we carry on with level 1 and 2 in this article.

A quick reminder

Our example is a webshop that lacks brutto prices. The original code of our shopping cart renderer might looked like this:


public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable&lt;Product&gt; inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice());
    }
    return result;
  }
}

Visibility level 1: Extracted code lives longer

After all the (rather depressing) level 0 implementations of our brutto price calculation, the separated method is the first visibility level to result in code that can be discussed and tested separately:


public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable<Product> inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice(),
            bruttoPriceFor(each));
    }
    return result;
  }

  /**
  * AN-17: Calculates the brutto price for the given product.
  */
  private Euro bruttoPriceFor(Product product) {
    final BigDecimal taxFactor = <gets the right tax factor from somewhere>
    return product.nettoPrice().multiplyWith(taxFactor);
  }
}

The new code is in lines 8 and 13 onwards. The new method was introduced to separate the calculation code from the rendering code. It still lives in the wrong class, but can be tested on its own if you make it public or package accessible. The comment now has a natural scope. And, most important: This implementation is the first where the notion of “brutto price” appears in the JavaDoc and the IDE.

Methods are the smallest parts of our object-oriented code. If you would have one method per requirement, you would just need one extra method of glue code to tie everything together. If one requirement needs to change or becomes obsolete, you know where to cut.

Methods are the primary focus of unit tests. You prepare the parameters for the method you want to test, call it and check the result. This is the AAA or triple-A normal form of unit testing: Arrange, Act, Assert. If several methods or even several objects need to be tested in conjunction, the testing effort rises.

We can conclude that with its own method, the VAT calculation now has its own home. Future readers can grasp the scope of our implementation easily and hopefully make changes under direct test coverage. This is the first visibility level that starts to feel like we meant it.

Visibility level 2: Make it a top-level affair

There is one part in object-oriented code that is even more basic than a method: the class. In Java, each class strives to have its own text file. Before you can write a method in Java, you need to define a class to contain it. Classes are the primary granularity level we navigate our code. Every IDE will show classes as the default elements in our “project explorers”. So what if we introduce a new class for our VAT calculation and move all our code there?

public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable<Product> inCart) {
    final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice(),
            CalculateBruttoPrice.forProduct(each));
    }
    return result;
  }
}
/**
 * AN-17: Calculates the brutto price with value added tax (VAT) for the given product.
 */
public class CalculateBruttoPrice {
  public static Euro forProduct(Product product) {
    final BigDecimal taxFactor = <gets the right tax factor from somewhere>
    return product.nettoPrice().multiplyWith(taxFactor); 
  }
}

The new code is in line 8 and the full new class file. This implementation might not look a lot different from level 1 (separate method), but it really is on another level. The brutto price calculation now isn’t tied to rendering shopping carts anymore. It is not tied to anything other than a given product. It is a top-level concept of our application now. Anybody with a product can call the method and receive the brutto price, from anywhere in our application (hopefully respecting our architecture boundaries).

Our unit test class now reads as if we had written it only for the new requirement: CalculateBruttoPriceTest. We still need to invent test products in our test, but the whole notion of render models and shopping carts is gone. In essence, we freed the concept of price calculation from its “evolutionary” ties.

Implementing the new requirement in a separate class, if feasible, adheres to the Single Responsibility Principle (SRP), that requires each class of a system to only have one reason to change. In our case, the CalculateBruttoPrice class only changes if the brutto prices needs adjustment. For all previous visibility levels, that wasn’t true. The ShowShoppingCart class would need modifications if the brutto prices or the shopping cart rendering were to be changed. This improvement is reason enough to elevate our implementation visibility past level 1.

In short, a good heuristics for new requirements (as opposed to change requests for existing requirements) is to start with a new class. If you are unsure, start lower, but keep in mind that classes are the main navigation layer of object-oriented code.

Visibility level 2+: Inviting the requirement to be part of the project’s language

Introducing a new class for our requirement felt good, but something still feels off. When we review the interface of the CalculateBruttoPrice, two things stick out immediately: The class is named as a service (CalculateXYZ as in “do XYZ for me”) and can only calculate brutto prices for products. Our customer was serious with his requirement, so it’s safe to assume that brutto prices will stay in the application and play a key role. We should reflect this seriousness by lifting the implementation visibility level once more and make the BruttoPrice a top level concept of our project’s domain:

public class ShowShoppingCart {
  public ShoppingCartRenderModel render(Iterable<Product> inCart) {
  final ShoppingCartRenderModel result = new ShoppingCartRenderModel();
    for (Product each : inCart) {
      result.addProductLine(
            each.description(),
            each.nettoPrice(),
            BruttoPrice.of(each).inEuro());
    }
    return result;
  }
}

The ShowShoppingCart code doesn’t look very different from the level 2 code beforehands. The new code is in line 8, too. The new class isn’t named like a service anymore, but like a concept or domain type. The named constructor of() returns a BruttoPrice instance and not just a Euro object:

/**
 * AN-17: Represents the brutto price with value added tax (VAT) for the given Taxable.
 */
public final class BruttoPrice {
  public static BruttoPrice of(Taxable item) {
    final BigDecimal taxFactor = <gets the right tax factor from somewhere>
    return new BruttoPrice(item.nettoPrice().multiplyWith(taxFactor));
  }
  
  private final Euro asValue;

  private BruttoPrice(Euro value) {
    this.asValue = value;
  }

  public Euro inEuro() {
    return this.asValue;
  }
}

Now, we can accumulate additional behaviour in the new BruttoPrice type if the need arises. With the service class of level 2, we probably wouldn’t have risen above the Euro abstraction and mixed up netto and brutto prices somewhere in the future.  If we model our NettoPrice and BruttoPrice as domain types, the compiler will help us keeping them separate – even if both contain Euros as their value.

With this visibility elevation, we discovered another abstraction: We can create brutto prices for virtually anything that can be taxed. It doesn’t have to be a product, it just needs a netto price and a tax factor. The new (abstract) domain type is named Taxable. Of course, Product is an implementation of Taxable.

This makes us even more independent from any webshop, shopping cart or product. We can now write unit tests for our BruttoPrice without being coupled to the Product class at all. We have successfully decoupled the cart/product part of our application from the prices part. Recognizing and implementing the independence of concepts is an important step towards even higher visibility levels. It is also the groundwork of a low coupled, high cohesive code base where most things fall into their place naturally.

The step from level 2 (separate class) to level 2+ (new domain type) wasn’t just syntactic sugar, it was driven by the insight that separation of concerns is the fundamental principle to achieve maintainability, as long as the abstractions aren’t overwhelming. A good indicator that you’ve taken it too far is when your domain expert (in our example our client) raises her eyebrows in surprise when you talk about your abstract domain types because the names sound outlandish and far-fetched.

But you can take your implementation visibility even further and should really consider doing so given the circumstances. We will learn about visibility level 3 (separate aggregate) in the next blog post of this series. Stay tuned!